impotency


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Related to impotency: psychological impotence

im·po·tence

, impotency (im'pŏ-tens, -ten-sē),
1. Weakness; lack of power.
2. Specifically, inability of the male to achieve or maintain penile erection and thus engage in copulation; a manifestation of neurologic, vascular, or psychological dysfunction.
[L. impotentia, inability, fr. in- neg. + potentia, power]

impotency

The inability to achieve or maintain an erection.

im·po·tence

, impotency (im'pŏ-tĕns, -tĕn-sē)
1. Weakness; lack of power.
2. Inability of the male to achieve and/or maintain penile erection and thus engage in copulation; a manifestation of neurologic, vascular, or psychological dysfunction.
[L. impotentia, inability, fr. in- neg. + potentia, power]

impotence

, impotency (im'po-tens, im'po-ten-se) [? + potentia, power]
A weakness, esp. pert. to the inability of a man to achieve or maintain an erection. Synonym: erectile dysfunction See: penile prosthesis; sex therapy; sexual dysfunction; sexual stimulant

Treatment

Sildenafil, alprostadil, and several other drugs are used to treat erectile dysfunction. Penile vacuum pumps and penile prostheses are among the nonpharmacological alternatives.

anatomical impotence

Impotence caused by a genital defect.

atonic impotence

Impotence resulting from paralysis of nerves supplying the penis.

functional impotence

Impotence not due to an organic or anatomical defect; usually of psychogenic origin. The individual may experience impotence with one or more sexual partners, but not with others.

neurogenic impotence

Impotence due to central nervous system lesions, paraplegia, or diabetic neuropathy.

pharmacological impotence

Erectile dysfunction due to the side effects of certain drugs and medications (e.g., alcohol, cytotoxic agents, barbiturates, beta blockers, marijuana, cimetidine, clonidine, guanethidine, immunosuppressives, lithium, opiates, phenothiazine, some antihypertensive agents, some diuretics, antidepressants, and anticholinergics).

psychic impotence

Psychogenic impotence.

psychogenic impotence

Impotence caused by emotional factors rather than organic disease.
Synonym: psychic impotence

vasculogenic impotence

Impotence due to an inadequate supply of arterial blood to the corpora cavernosa of the penis.
References in periodicals archive ?
PDE 5 inhibitors (Phosphodiesterase inhibitors) revolutionalised the treatment of impotency.
Finally, however, the impotency poem tradition climaxes with a series of anonymous texts that respond to this articulation of the impotency poem in English as capable of commenting on wider social and political concepts.
The doctors emphasised the need for men to understand that there were several treatments to impotency including changing stressful conditions, sexual counselling, local treatment such as injections, surgery -- placing a hydraulic pump - and of course the sildenafil pill (PDE5 inhibitor), commonly known as Viagra.
Revenge can be deferred because of an impotency that makes it impossible or unlikely that the revenge will be successful.
Amy is now 18 months-old and her mum is expecting a SECOND baby after taking the impotency drug again.
The Court of Appeal judgment has put the spotlight on the impotency of the present Family Court system, and Lord Justice Thorpe is voicing the concerns that reformers have been predicting and warning about.
Decatur, GA CAMA Lecture--Have a Healthy Prostate: Learn how to decrease your chances of developing prostatitis, impotency and testicular or prostate cancer via proper nutrition etc.
He said his impotency was caused by a cocktail of drugs he takes for high blood pressure and other medical problems.
Unlike the male impotency pill Viagra, which acts on the sexual organs, the drug in the most recent study stimulates the brain.
The latest addition to the recreational drug cabinet is Viagra, often used to correct the impotency side effects of other drugs, including ecstacy, ketamine, and crystal meth.
A man claiming his picture was used without his consent in an advertisement for an impotency clinic has sued the Los Angeles Times and the clinic that placed the ad, according to court records.
Finally, Mealey has ceased publication of Henley's Impotency Drug Watch, launched as Mealey's Viagra Watch in mid-1998.