impacted cerumen


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impacted cerumen

accumulated cerumen forming a solid mass that adheres to the wall of the external auditory canal.
References in periodicals archive ?
We excluded external ear, middle ear and other ear diseases as well as systemic diseases that may affect hearing, such as otitis externa, impacted cerumen, otitis media, noise damage, ototoxic drug poisoning, inner ear malformation, diabetes mellitus, hypertension and chronic nephritis.
Chronic otitis, conductive hearing loss because of chronic middle-ear effusion or impacted cerumen, and enlarged tonsils can result in obstructive sleep apnea.
There is no evidence that they remove impacted cerumen, and candling can cause serious damage to the ear canal and eardrum.
2] Impacted cerumen is a major cause of primary care consultation and common co-morbidity in ENT patients [3] and people with mental retardation [4].
Although not the most common finding on otomicroscopy, the presence of complete occlusion of the ear canal due to impacted cerumen was higher (14.
The appearance of the tick had closely resembled impacted cerumen, which had led to delayed diagnosis and an unnecessary CT scan.
Among the possible causes for this are impacted cerumen (ear wax), labyrinthitis (inflammation of the inner ear), otosclerosis (abnormal bone growth; sometimes more frequently occurring in certain families), hysteria (emotional instability), and overdose of drugs such as quinine.
The results indicated that impacted cerumen does cause a significant degree of conductive hearing loss.
This device is easy to use and will be a timesaver for the treatment of residents with impacted cerumen.
Impacted cerumen removal, instrument assisted; evaluation and treatment of vertigo patients (otolaryngology).
Two common causes of conductive loss include impacted cerumen (wax) and otitis media with effusion (fluid), referred to as OME.
TABLE 2 Common causes of hearing loss (16-18) Newborns, children, and adolescents Childhood infection (eg, measles, mumps, meningitis) Genetic syndrome (eg, Down syndrome, Usher syndrome, Alport syndrome) Head trauma In utero infection (eg, toxoplasmosis, rubella, HSV, CMV, syphilis) Noise exposure Otitis media (recurrent) Ototoxic medication * Premature delivery Adults and the elderly Acoustic neuroma Head trauma Impacted cerumen Noise exposure Otitis media (recurrent) Otosclerosis Ototoxic medication * Presbycusis * Includes aminoglycosides, cisplatin, and loop diuretics, among others.