immunosuppression


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Related to immunosuppression: Immunosuppressive drugs

immunosuppression

 [im″u-no-sŭ-presh´un]
inhibition of the immune response to unfamiliar antigens that may be present; used in transplantation procedures to prevent rejection of the transplant or graft, and in autoimmune disease, allergy, multiple myeloma, and other conditions.

im·mu·no·sup·pres·sion

(im'yū-nō-sū-presh'ŭn),
Prevention or interference with the development of immunologic response; may reflect natural immunologic unresponsiveness (tolerance), may be artificially induced by chemical, biologic, or physical agents, or may be caused by disease.

immunosuppression

/im·mu·no·sup·pres·sion/ (-sah-presh´un) prevention or diminution of the immune response, such as by radiation, antimetabolites, or specific antibody.immunosuppres´sive

immunosuppression

(ĭm′yə-nō-sə-prĕsh′ən, ĭ-myo͞o′-)
n.
Suppression of the immune response, as by drugs or radiation, in order to prevent the rejection of grafts or transplants or to control autoimmune diseases. Also called immunodepression.

im′mu·no·sup·pres′sant (-prĕs′ənt) n.
im′mu·no·sup·pressed′ (-prĕst′) adj.
im′mu·no·sup·pres′sive adj.

immunosuppression

[-səpresh′ən]
Etymology: L, immunis + supprimere, to press down
1 the administration of agents that significantly interfere with the ability of the immune system to respond to antigenic stimulation by inhibiting cellular and humoral immunity. Corticosteroids; cytotoxic drugs, including antimetabolites and alkylating agents; antilymphocytic antibodies; and irradiation may produce immunosuppression. Immunosuppression may be deliberate, such as in preparation for bone marrow or other transplantation to prevent rejection by the host of the donor tissue, or incidental, such as often results from chemotherapy for the treatment of cancer.
2 an abnormal condition of the immune system characterized by markedly inhibited ability to respond to antigenic stimuli. immunosuppressed, adj.

Immunosuppression

Techniques to prevent transplant graft rejection by the body's immune system.

immunosuppression

chemical, pharmacological, physical or immunological suppression of the normal response to foreign material (e.g. microorganisms, donor tissue)

im·mu·no·sup·pres·sion

(im'yū-nō-sŭ-presh'ŭn)
Prevention or interference with the development of immunologic response; may reflect natural immunologic unresponsiveness, may be artificially induced by chemical, biologic, or physical agents, or caused by disease.

immunosuppression,

n 1. the administration of agents that significantly interfere with the ability of the immune system to respond to antigenic stimulation by inhibiting cellular and humoral immunity. It may be deliberate, such as in preparation for bone marrow or other transplantation to prevent rejection by the host of the donor tissue.
2. an abnormal condition of the immune system characterized by markedly inhibited ability to respond to antigenic stimuli.

immunosuppression

diminished immune responsiveness; may occur following certain infections, notably viral infections such as retroviruses or herpesviruses (cytamegaloviruses), exposure to x-irradiation or toxic chemicals or be deliberately produced in transplantation patients by drugs or antilymphocyte serum.

therapeutic immunosuppression
treatment which suppresses immune function where it is contributing to the disease process. Includes immune-mediated diseases of the eye, hemopoietic system, skin, kidney and central nervous system.
References in periodicals archive ?
Theoretically, the upregulated expression of co-inhibitory receptors and the downregulated expression of the co-stimulatory receptor is the sign of sepsis-induced immunosuppression.
and basiliximab, led to a decrease in acute rejection rates and seemed to present a more potent foundation on which to base steroid-free, or steroid withdrawal, immunosuppression (Heilman et al.
Caption: Administer vaccines at least 2 weeks prior to planned immunosuppression.
Schultz notes that there are several ways to get around the immunosuppression problem created when the adenovirus and distemper vaccine viruses are replicating at the same time.
Of the 90 patients who received AN, 21% were due to technical failure, 20% to acute onset rejection and hemorrhage, 2% to hyperacute rejection, 3% due to primary non-function, 19% to permit weaning of immunosuppression, 12% to chronic or recurrent infections and 23% to other non-specific causes (Table 1).
Strickler, of Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, said that the study provided novel evidence associating HPV-related invasive cancers with the level of immunosuppression in HIV-positive patients.
The immunosuppression induced by HHV-6 probably favored the EBV infection.
In addition, antiretroviral therapy has changed the landscape of HIV and cancer: severe immunosuppression is not necessarily the only key factor that allows AIDS-defining cancers to emerge.
Thymoglobulin, which was introduced to the US market in 1999, is a pasteurized anti-thymocyte rabbit immunoglobulin indicated for the treatment of renal transplant acute rejection, in conjunction with concomitant immunosuppression.
Given the production problem, the CDC recommended vaccinations be administered first to high-risk populations and health workers in contact with them, including: persons 65 or older; residents of nursing homes and other chronic-care facilities that house persons of any age who have chronic medical conditions; individuals who have chronic disorders of the pulmonary or cardiovascular systems, including asthma; and, those who have required regular medical followup or hospitalization during the preceding year because of chronic metabolic diseases (including diabetes mellitus), renal dysfunction, hemoglobinopathies or immunosuppression (e.
1,2] However, in the case presented here, that of a black 13-year-old girl, the patient had no clinical evidence of immunosuppression.