immunofluorescence

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Related to immunofluorescence microscopy: Confocal microscopy

immunofluorescence

 [im″u-no-floo″o-res´ens]
a method of determining the location of antigen (or antibody) in a tissue section or smear using a specific antibody (or antigen) labeled with a fluorochrome. There are two major types of immunofluorescence techniques, both based on the antigen--antibody reaction, in which the antibody attaches itself to a specific antigen.

In the direct fluorescent antibody (DFA) method, the antibody coats the antigen, for example, a bacterial cell, and cannot be easily removed by elution (washing). The antibody remains attached to the cell after all nonantibody globulin has been washed away. Since the antibody has been rendered fluorescent by conjugation with fluorescein or another dye, the outline of the bacterial cell that it coats can readily be seen with a special microscope.

In the indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA) method, the specific antibody is allowed to react with the antigen. The nonantibody globulin is then washed off. This is then treated with a labeled antibody to the specific antibody. For example, if the specific antibody was raised in a rabbit, it is then treated with fluorescein-labeled anti-rabbit globulin, which results in a combination of this labeled antibody with the rabbit immunoglobulin already attached to the antigen.

Fluorescent antibody studies have been used in the detection of numerous bacterial, viral, fungal, and protozoan infections and in the identification of many microscopic tissue constituents.
Direct immunofluorescence. In direct immunofluorescence the object is visualized using a fluorescein-tagged antibody. From Hart and Shears, 1997.

im·mu·no·fluor·es·cence

(im'yū-nō-flōr-es'ens, i-myū'nō-),
An immunohistochemical technique using labeling of antibodies by a fluorescent dye to identify antigenic material specific for the labeled antibody. Specific binding of antibody can be determined microscopically through the production of a characteristic visible light by the application of ultraviolet rays to the preparation.
See also: fluorescent antibody technique.

immunofluorescence

/im·mu·no·flu·o·res·cence/ (-fldbobr-res´ens) a method of determining the location of antigen (or antibody) in a tissue section or smear by the pattern of fluorescence resulting when the specimen is exposed to the specific antibody (or antigen) labeled with a fluorochrome.

immunofluorescence

(ĭm′yə-nō-flo͝o-rĕs′əns, -flô-, -flō-)
n.
Any of various techniques that use antibodies chemically linked to a fluorescent dye to identify or quantify antigens in a tissue sample.

im′mu·no·fluo·res′cent adj.

immunofluorescence

[-floo͡res′əns]
Etymology: L, immunis + fluere, to flow
a technique used for the rapid identification of an antigen by exposing it to known antibodies tagged with the fluorescent dye fluorescein and observing the characteristic antigen-antibody reaction of precipitation. As the fluorescent antibody reacts with its specific antigen, the precipitate appears luminous in the ultraviolet light projected by a fluorescent microscope. Many of the most common infectious organisms can be identified by this technique. Among them are Candida albicans, Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Shigella, Staphylococcus aureus, and several viruses, including rabies virus and many enteroviruses. See also fluorescent antibody test, fluorescent microscopy. immunofluorescent, adj.
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Immunofluorescence

im·mu·no·fluor·es·cence

(im'yū-nō-flōr-es'ĕns)
An immunohistochemical technique using labeling of antibodies by fluorescent dyes to identify bacterial, viral, or other antigenic material specific for the labeled antibody; the binding of antibody can be determined microscopically by the application of ultraviolet rays to the preparation.
See also: fluorescent antibody technique

immunofluorescence

The detection and identification of antigenic material by observing, under the microscope, the fluorescence of known, specific, fluorescein-linked (conjugated) antibodies that have become attached to it.

immunofluorescence

See FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE.

immunofluorescence

a method of determining the location of antigen (or antibody) in a tissue section or smear using a specific antibody (or antigen) labeled with a fluorochrome. In the direct methods, the fluorochome is chemically linked to the specific antibody. In indirect methods, a labeled anti-immunoglobulin that binds to the specific antibody is used. See also fluorescence microscopy.
References in periodicals archive ?
When immunofluorescence microscopy was used, fluorescent rod-like bodies were clearly seen in some cells (figure 1B).
Immunofluorescence microscopy is usually negative, or at times, there may be focal, nonspecific positivity with immunoglobulins and complements.
Otomycosis: The detection of fungi in ears by immunofluorescence microscopy.
Immunofluorescence microscopy was negative for IgG, IgM, IgA, C3, C4, and [Kappa] and [Lambda] light chains in all cases.
Unfortunately, our current view of the cytoskeletal architecture of the fission yeast microtubule comes from immunofluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy of static, fixed cells (2).
For examination by immunofluorescence microscopy, 200 [micro]l of hemolymph and gill washing from each oyster was air dried overnight.
com) has produced a new Anti-NF-B monoclonal antibody (catalog number 200-301-065) validated by several assays relevant for discovery including immunofluorescence microscopy (IF), immunohistochemistry (IHC), western blotting (WB) and ELISA (E).
In situ immunofluorescence microscopy and osteocalcin promoter luciferase assay were performed to compare the functions of the RUNX2 mutation with those of wild-type RUNX2.
While tight junctions of neuronal vascular endothelial cells have been extensively studied and comprise of a series of up to 30 protein components, less is known of the organization of adherence mechanisms of SCEC, although electron- and immunofluorescence microscopy show the presence of tight junctions.
As a consequence, immunofluorescence microscopy is the only widely available technique for screening for these antibodies.
We then employed indirect immunofluorescence microscopy to examine localization of galectin-3 on HT-29,MSC-1 ,ASC-17D and MA-10 cells.
21,23-27] Like uncomplicated deposits, this microangiopathy primarily involves afferent arterioles, and large amounts of immunoglobulin and complement are found in arteriolar walls by immunofluorescence microscopy.