immune serum


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Related to immune serum: immune serum globulin

serum

 [se´rum] (pl. serums, se´ra) (L.)
the clear portion of any animal or plant fluid that remains after the solid elements have been separated out. The term usually refers to blood serum, the clear, straw-colored, liquid portion of the plasma that does not contain fibrinogen or blood cells, and remains fluid after clotting of blood. Blood serum from persons or animals whose bodies have built up antibodies is called antiserum or immune serum. Inoculation with such an antiserum provides temporary, or passive, immunity against the disease, and is used when a person has already been exposed to or has contracted the disease. Diseases in which passive immunization is sometimes used include diphtheria, tetanus, botulism, and gas gangrene.
antilymphocyte serum (ALS) antiserum derived from animals that have been immunized against human lymphocytes, a powerful nonspecific immunosuppressive agent that causes destruction of circulating lymphocytes.
antirabies serum antiserum obtained from the blood serum or plasma of animals immunized with rabies vaccine; used for postexposure prophylaxis against rabies if rabies immune globulin is unavailable.
blood grouping s's preparations containing particular antibodies against red cell antigens, used for blood typing. Those most commonly used are the anti-A and anti-B blood grouping serums used to determine ABO blood types and the anti-Rh blood grouping serums (anti-D, anti-C, anti-E, anti-c, and anti-e) used to determine Rh blood types.
serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (SGOT) see aspartate transaminase.
serum glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (SGPT) see alanine transaminase.
immune serum antiserum.
pooled serum the mixed serum from a number of individuals.
serum sickness a hypersensitivity reaction following the administration of foreign serum or other antigens; it is marked by urticarial rashes, edema, adenitis, joint pains, high fever, and prostration. Reactions to tetanus antitoxin derived from horse serum were especially common but are now rare owing to refinement of the antigenic components.
serum sickness syndrome a serum sickness–like hypersensitivity reaction occurring after the administration of certain drugs. It is marked clinically by low-grade fever, urticaria, facial edema, pain and swelling of the joints, and lymphadenopathy, and occasionally may be associated with neuritis of the brachial plexus, guillain-barré syndrome, periarteritis nodosa, and nephritis.

an·ti·se·rum

(an'tē-sē'rŭm),
Polyclonal serum that contains demonstrable antibody or antibodies specific for one (monovalent or specific antiserum) or more (polyvalent antiserum) antigens; may be prepared from the blood of animals inoculated with an antigenic material or from the blood of animals and people who have been stimulated by natural contact with an antigen (as in those who recover from an attack of disease).
Synonym(s): immune serum

immune serum

See antiserum.

an·ti·se·rum

(an'tē-sēr'ŭm)
Serum that contains antibody or antibodies specific for one or more antigens; may be prepared from the blood of animals inoculated with an antigenic material or from the blood of animals and people who have been stimulated by natural contact with an antigen (as by an attack of disease).
Synonym(s): immune serum.

serum

pl. sera, serums [L.] the clear portion of any animal or plant fluid that remains after the solid elements have been separated out. The term usually refers to blood serum, the clear, straw-colored, liquid portion of the plasma that does not contain fibrinogen or blood cells, and remains fluid after clotting of blood.
Blood serum from animals whose bodies have built up antibodies is called antiserum or immune serum. Inoculation with such an antiserum provides temporary, or passive, immunity against the disease.

serum albumin mastitis test
a high concentration of serum albumin in milk indicates the presence of mastitis in the quarter.
antilymphocyte serum
serum breaks
in classical swine fever (hog cholera) vaccination when a serum-simultaneous vaccination program is not effective and it is assumed that the hyperimmune serum was ineffective.
serum clot time
see prothrombin consumption test.
serum enzymes
enzymes of individual tissues are released into the blood when the tissue is damaged or when there is much activity in it. The levels are used as a measure of activity or injury.
serum-fast
resistant to the effects of serum.
serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (SGOT)
serum glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (SGPT)
immune serum
serum from an immunized animal, containing specific antibody or antibodies.
serum osmolality
a measure of the number of dissolved particles per unit of water in serum. See also serum osmolality.
pooled serum
the mixed serum from a number of animals.
serum protein
see serum protein.
serum sickness
a group of immediate or antibody-mediated hypersensitivity reactions (also referred to as type III hypersensitivities) that includes Arthus reaction, serum sickness and immune complex diseases. The pathogenesis involves formation of bulky antibody-antigen complexes in the walls of small blood vessels; the complexes fix complement and cause necrosis and thrombus formation. There is infiltration of polymorphonuclear cells from which lysosomal enzymes are released.
serum-simultaneous immunization
an outdated method of vaccination, most popular at one time in the vaccination of pigs against classical swine fever (hog cholera). Live virus and antiserum to the virus were injected into the patient simultaneously; breakdowns in the system were frequent, leading to severe outbreaks of the target disease.
serum thymic factor
a humoral factor enhancing T lymphocyte responsiveness.
References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, although the isolates were successfully neutralized in vitro with the Lim-Benyesh-Melnick immune serum pools, the amino acid changes affecting VP1 should be taken into account during the evaluation of the neutralization test results.
The immune serum used in passive immunization experiments was prepared by pooling convalescent-phase serum samples of six hamsters that were bled 5 weeks after infection with WNV strain NY385-99.
Convalescent-phase sera from some of these animals were used to prepare the WNV immune serum used in the passive immunization experiments described below.
In the past, antibody-based therapies were dependent on immune serum that was limited in availability and was associated with substantial side effects when the serum originated from animals (2,3).
Importance of dose of neutralizing antibodies in treatment of Argentine haemorrhagic fever with immune serum.