immune complex disease


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immune

 [ĭ-mūn´]
1. being highly resistant to a disease because of the formation of humoral antibodies or the development of immunologically competent cells, or both, or as a result of some other mechanism, as interferon activities in viral infections.
2. characterized by the development of humoral antibodies or cellular immunity, or both, following antigenic challenge.
3. produced in response to antigenic challenge, as immune serum globulin.
immune response the reaction to and interaction with substances interpreted by the body as not-self, the result being humoral and cellular immunity. Called also immune reaction. The immune response depends on a functioning thymus and the conversion of stem cells to B and T lymphocytes. These lymphocytes contribute to antibody production, cellular immunity, and immunologic memory.
Disorders of the Immune Response. Pathologic conditions associated with an abnormal immune response (immunopathy) may result from (1) immunodepression, that is, an absent or deficient supply of the components of either humoral or cellular immunity, or both; (2) excessive production of gamma globulins; (3) overreaction to antigens of extrinsic origin, that is, antigens from outside the body; and (4) abnormal response of the body to its own cells and tissues.

Those conditions arising from immunosuppression include agammaglobulinemia (absence of gamma globulins) and hypogammaglobulinemia (a decrease of circulating antibodies). Factors that may cause or contribute to suppression of the immune response include (1) congenital absence of the thymus or of the stem cells that are precursors of B and T lymphocytes; (2) malnutrition, in which there is a deficiency of the specific nutrients essential to the life of antibody-synthesizing cells; (3) cancer, viral infections, and extensive burns, all of which overburden the immune response mechanisms and rapidly deplete the supply of antigen-specific antibody; (4) certain drugs, including alcohol and heroin, some antibiotics, antipsychotics, and the antineoplastics used in the treatment of cancer.

Overproduction of gamma globulins is manifested by an excessive proliferation of plasma cells (multiple myeloma). hypersensitivity is the result of an overreaction to substances entering the body. Examples of this kind of inappropriate immune response include hay fever, drug and food allergies, extrinsic asthma, serum sickness, and anaphylaxis.

Autoimmune diseases are manifestations of the body's abnormal response to and inability to tolerate its own cells and tissues. For reasons not yet fully understood, the body fails to interpret its own cells as self and, as it would with other foreign (not-self) substances, utilizes antibodies and immunologically competent cells to destroy and contain them.
immune system a complex system of cellular and molecular components whose primary function is distinguishing self from nonself and defense against foreign organisms or substances; see also immune response. The primary cellular components are lymphocytes and macrophages, and the primary molecular components are antibodies and lymphokines; granulocytes and the complement system are also involved in immune responses but are not always considered part of the immune system per se.
Major organs and tissues of the immune system in the child. From McKinney et al., 2000.
immune complex disease local or systemic disease caused by the formation of circulating antibody-antigen immune complexes and their deposition in tissue, due to activation of complement and to recruitment and activation of leukocytes in type III hypersensitivity reactions.

im·mune com·plex dis·ease

an immunologic category of diseases evoked by the deposition of antigen-antibody in the microvasculature. Complement is frequently involved and the breakdown products of complement attract polymorphonuclear leukocytes to the site of deposition. Damage to tissue is frequently caused by "frustrated" phagocytosis by polymorphonuclear cells. Vasculitis or nephritis is common. Other clinical manifestations include fever, arthralgias, and cutaneous eruptions. Arthus phenomenon and serum sickness are classic examples, but many other disorders, including most of the connective tissue diseases, may belong in this immunologic category. Immune complex diseases can also occur during a variety of diseases of known etiology, such as subacute bacterial endocarditis.
See also: autoimmune disease, immune complex.

immune complex disease

Immunology Any of a number of conditions—caused by circulating antigen-antibody-immune complexes, which in the face of mild antigen excess, lodge in small vessels and filtering organs of the circulation Clinical Fever, enlarged and/or tender joints, splenic congestion, proteinuria due to glomerular IC deposition, eosinophilia, hypocomplementemia, lymphadenopathy, glomerulonephritis–HTN, oliguria, hematuria, edema, skin–purpura, urticaria, ulcers, carditis, hepatitis, myositis, necrotizing vasculitis. See Immune complex.
Immune complex disease
Arthus reaction Acute hemorrhagic necrosis that follows re-exposure to an antigen, which attracts PMNs, activates complement, binds ICs by the Fc receptor, causing phagocytosis, ↑ production of chemotactic factors, especially C5b67 and ↑ anaphylotoxins C3a and C5a, resulting in vasodilation
Serum sickness A reaction that is milder than the Arthus reaction, occurring 8-12 days after exposure to the antigen, at the time of 'equivalence' (antigen and antibody are in a 1:1 ratio), after injection of a foreign protein mixture, eg horse serum for antitoxin to tetanus  

im·mune com·plex dis·ease

(i-myūn' kom'pleks di-zēz')
Immunologic category of diseases evoked by the deposition of antigen-antibody or antigen-antibody-complement complexes on cell surfaces, with subsequent development of vasculitis; nephritis is common. Most of the connective tissue diseases may belong in this immunologic category; immune complex diseases can also occur during a variety of diseases of known etiology, such as subacute bacterial endocarditis.
See also: autoimmune disease

im·mune com·plex dis·ease

(i-myūn' kom'pleks di-zēz')
Immunologic category of diseases evoked by the deposition of antigen-antibody in the microvasculature. Complement is frequently involved and the breakdown products of complement attract polymorphonuclear leukocytes to site of deposition. Damage to tissue is frequently caused by "frustrated" phagocytosis by polymorphonuclear cells. Immune complex diseases can also occur during a variety of diseases of known etiology, such as subacute bacterial endocarditis.
See also: autoimmune disease

disease

traditionally defined as a finite abnormality of structure or function with an identifiable pathological or clinicopathological basis, and with a recognizable syndrome or constellation of clinical signs.
This definition has long since been widened to embrace subclinical diseases in which there is no tangible clinical syndrome but which are identifiable by chemical, hematological, biophysical, microbiological or immunological means. The definition is used even more widely to include failure to produce at expected levels in the presence of normal levels of nutritional supply and environmental quality. It is to be expected that the detection of residues of disqualifying chemicals in foods of animal origin will also come to be included within the scope of disease.
For specific diseases see under the specific name, e.g. Aujeszsky's disease, Bang's disease, foot-and-mouth disease.

air-borne disease
the causative agent is transmitted via the air without the need for intervention by other medium. See also wind-borne disease.
disease carrier
clinical disease
see clinical (3).
disease cluster
a group of animals with the same disease occurs at an unusual level of prevalence for the population as a whole. The cluster may be in space, with high concentrations in particular localities, or in time, with high concentrations in particular seasons or in particular years.
communicable disease
infectious disease in which the causative agents may pass or be carried from one animal to another directly or indirectly on inanimate objects or via vectors.
complicating disease
one that occurs in the course of some other disease as a complication.
constitutional disease
one involving a system of organs or one with widespread signs.
contagious disease
see communicable disease (above).
disease control
reducing the prevalence of a disease in a population, including eradication, by chemical, pharmaceutical, quarantine, management including culling, or other means or combinations of means.
disease control programs
organized routines specifying agents, administration, time and personnel allocations, community support, funding, participation of corporate or government agencies, animal and animal product disposal.
deficiency disease
a condition due to dietary or metabolic deficiency, including all diseases caused by an insufficient supply of essential nutrients.
degenerative joint disease
see degenerative joint disease, osteoarthritis.
demyelinating disease
any condition characterized by destruction of myelin.
disease determinant
any variable associated with a disease which, if removed or altered, results in a change in the incidence of the disease.
egg-borne disease
an infectious disease of birds in which the agent is spread via the egg.
endemic disease
see endemic.
environmental disease control
control by changing the environment, e.g. draining a swamp, ventilating a barn.
epidemic disease
etiological disease classification
diseases arranged in the order of their etiological agents, e.g. bacterial, mycoplasma.
exotic disease
a disease that does not occur in the subject country. Said of infectious diseases that may be introduced, e.g. rabies is exotic to the UK, contagious bovine pleuropneumonia is exotic to the USA.
focal disease
a localized disease.
fulminant disease
an explosive outbreak in a group or a rapidly developing, peracute development of a disease in an individual. Called also fulminating.
functional disease
any disease involving body functions but not associated with detectable organic lesion or change.
generalized disease
one involving all or many body systems; often said of infectious diseases in which there is spread via the bloodstream. See also systemic disease (below).
glycogen disease
any of a group of genetically determined disorders of glycogen metabolism, marked by abnormal storage of glycogen in the body tissues. See also glycogen storage disease.
heavy chain disease
hemolytic disease of newborn
see alloimmune hemolytic anemia of the newborn.
hemorrhagic disease of newborn
see neonatal hemorrhagic disease.
disease history
that part of a patient's history which relates only to the disease from which the patient is suffering.
holoendemic disease
most animals in the population are affected.
hyperendemic disease
the rate of infection is steady but high.
hypoendemic disease
the rate of infection is steady and only a few animals are infected.
immune complex disease
see immune complex disease.
infectious disease
one caused by small living organisms including viruses, bacteria, fungi, protozoa and metazoan parasites. It may be contagious in origin, result from nosocomial infections or be due to endogenous microflora of the nose and throat, skin or bowel. See also communicable disease (above).
manifestational disease classification
diseases arranged in the order of their clinical signs, epidemiological characteristics, necropsy lesions, e.g. sudden death diseases.
mesoendemic disease
the disease occurs at an even rate and a moderate proportion of animals are infected.
metabolic disease
see metabolic diseases.
molecular disease
any disease in which the pathogenesis can be traced to a single, precise chemical alteration, usually of a protein, which is either abnormal in structure or present in reduced amounts. The corresponding defect in the DNA coding for the protein may also be known.
multicausal disease
1. a number of causative agents are needed to combine to cause the disease.
2. the same disease can be caused by a number of different agents.
multifactorial disease
see multicausal disease (above).
new disease
disease not previously recorded. May be variants on an existing disease, e.g. infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, or escapes from other species, e.g. the Marburg virus disease of humans.
notifiable disease
a disease of which any occurrence is required by law to be notified to government authorities.
organic disease
see organic disease.
pandemic disease
a very widespread epidemic involving several countries or an entire continent.
quarantinable disease
a disease which the law requires to be restricted in its spread by putting the affected animals, farms or properties on which it occurs in quarantine.
reportable disease
see notifiable disease (above).
disease reservoir
any animal or fomite in which an infectious disease agent is preserved in a viable state or multiplies and upon which it may depend for survival.
secondary disease
1. a disease subsequent to or a consequence of another disease or condition.
2. a condition due to introduction of incompatible, immunologically competent cells into a host rendered incapable of rejecting them by heavy exposure to ionizing radiation.
self-limited disease
sex-limited disease
disease limited in its occurrence to one or other sex. See also sex-linked.
sexually transmitted disease (STD)
a disease that can be acquired by sexual intercourse.
slaughter disease control
see slaughter (2).
sporadic disease
occurring singly and haphazardly; widely scattered; not epidemic or endemic. See also sporadic bovine encephalomyelitis, sporadic leukosis, sporadic lymphangitis.
storage disease
disease syndrome
systemic disease
sufficiently widespread in the body to cause clinical signs referable to any organ or system, and in which localization of infection may occur in any organ.
disease triangle
interaction between the host, the disease agent, and the environment.
disease wastage
loss of income generated by production of milk, eggs, fiber, or loss of capital value because of diminution in the patient's value.
wasting disease
any disease marked especially by progressive emaciation and weakness.
zoonotic disease
disease capable of spread from animals to humans. See also zoonosis.

immune

1. being highly resistant to a disease because of the formation of humoral antibodies or the development of immunologically competent cells, or both, or as a result of some other mechanism, such as interferon activities in viral infections.
2. characterized by the development of antibodies or cellular immunity, or both, following exposure to antigen.
3. produced in response to antigen, such as immune serum globulin. The essential feature of antibody and cell-mediated immunity is that they are highly antigen specific.

immune adherence
the binding of antibody-antigen-complement complexes to complement receptors found on red blood cells.
immune complex
see antibody-antigen complex.
immune complex disease
disease induced by the deposition of or association with antigen-antibody-complement complexes in the microvasculature of tissues. Fixation of complement component C3 by the complexes initiates inflammation. See also serum sickness, hypersensitivity.
immune complex reaction
type III hypersensitivity (1).
immune deficiency disease
one in which animals have inadequate immune responses and so are more susceptible to infectious disease. The defect may be primary (inherited), or secondary (acquired) which usually develops after birth because of toxins or infectious agents. See also combined immune deficiency syndrome, hypogammaglobulinemia, agammaglobulinemia, inherited parakeratosis, chediak-higashi syndrome and canine granulocytopathy syndrome.
immune hemolysis
see immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (below).
immune interferon
immune modulator
immune reaction
immune response.
immune reaction fever
aseptic fever occurring in anaphylaxis, angioedema.
immune response
the specific response to substances interpreted by the body as not-self, the result being humoral and cellular immunity. The immune response depends on a functioning thymus and the conversion of stem cells to B and T lymphocytes. These B and T lymphocytes contribute to antibody production, cellular immunity and immunological memory. See also humoral immunity.
immune response (Ir) genes
see immune response genes.
immune surveillance
the detection by lymphocytes, especially T lymphocytes, of new antigens, particularly on tumor cells.
immune system
consists of the primary lymphoid organs (thymus and Bursa of Fabricius or its equivalent (bone marrow) in mammals) and secondary lymphoid organs (lymph nodes, spleen and other lymphoid tissue).
immune tolerance
see immunological tolerance.