imbrication


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

im·bri·ca·tion

(im'bri-kā'shŭn),
The operative overlapping of layers of tissue in the closure of wounds or the repair of defects.
[see imbricate]

im·bri·ca·tion

(im'bri-kā'shŭn)
The operative overlapping of layers of tissue in the closure of wounds or the repair of defects.

imbrication

An overlapping of the free edges of a tissue as in the surgical correction of a tissue defect or of a weakened area.

imbrication

surgical pleating and folding of tissue to realign organs and provide extra support, e.g. chronically stretched joint capsule.

Flo imbrication
a method for repair of cranial cruciate repair in the dog in which sutures are placed around the patellar tendon and the fabellae.
References in periodicals archive ?
At the same time, some critics, Attwell included, have insisted that Coetzee's studied self-reflexivity in the face of what might be called the "representational literalism" of apartheid-era South African literature was neither intransitive nor self-contained, a move which has allowed Coetzee's imbrication in the political matrix of the apartheid state to be addressed (Attwell 1993; cf.
She is in many ways articulating an imbrication between two structures of patriarchy.
In seeking to illuminate the Victorians' own methods of categorization, Black dismantles the binaries that so often bedevil modern analyses of the nineteenth century, unsettling distinctions between high art and popular culture, and insisting upon the imbrication of literary texts in the same historical circumstances that produced their spectacular and defining museological projects.
What is no doubt more important here is Walton's sense of the imbrication of life and work, the ways in which each fertilized and shaped the other.
Moreover, she argues that the growing social imbrication between Turkish ruling "others" and the city's indigenous inhabitants, mainly Arab or Berber, are indicators of larger transformations.
79] Statius (94-99) has recently discussed the manner in which Montaigne's philosophy subverts "concepts" with metaphors, and this passage is exemplary for its layering and imbrication of several metaphors whose harmoniously coordinated transfers amount to the articulation of notions almost ineffable in conceptual terms.
In caimans and Diplocynodon, the anterior ossification usually bears small pits posterior to the imbrication zone, and these pits are not arranged in a single discrete row (e.
We describe a new imbrication technique that reduces pain, minimizes bleeding, and serves to realign muscle tension, thereby reducing palatal bulk.
It consists in reanimating their imbrication, in raising their stakes: on the one hand, there are those materials provided and arranged by vocabulary and syntax; on the other hand, there are those materials delivered up by the body's functioning, and by that mysterious, negatively defined entity which psychoanalysis has, according to Freud's simple formula, "inserted between the physical and what has been called until now the psychic.
Each of these is equally compatible with Bennett's sense of the discipline as being about the imbrication of knowledge and power.
Cette imbrication fait sans contredit la richesse de cet ouvrage abondamment documente et ponctue d'innombrables faits, petits et grands, qui illustrent l'argumentation de l'auteur.
The second major section, parts IV and V, deals with Machaut's literary career prior to the Voir-Dit, and specifically with the development at his hands of the narrative dit: the growth of his interest in first-person narrative, the imbrication of the fictional and the historical, the growing interest in parallels between a mythical pseudo-past and a mundane present, the increasing deployment of what one might call the rhetoric of digression.