identity

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identity

 [i-den´tĭ-te]
the aggregate of characteristics by which an individual is recognized by himself and others.
disturbed personal identity a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as the inability to distinguish between the self and nonself.
gender identity a person's concept of himself or herself as being male and masculine or female and feminine, or ambivalent, usually based on physical characteristics, parental attitudes and expectations, and psychological and social pressures. It is the private experience of gender role.

i·den·ti·ty

(ī-den'ti-tē),
The summation of a person's internalized history of relationship with objects, his or her social role, and his or her perception of both; the experience of "I". See: ego.
See also: persona, shadow (2).

identity

/iden·ti·ty/ (i-den´tit-e) the aggregate of characteristics by which an individual is recognized by himself and others.
gender identity  a person's concept of himself as being male and masculine or female and feminine, or ambivalent.

identity1

[īden′titē]
a component of self-concept characterized by one's persisting consciousness of being oneself, separate and distinct from others. Identity diffusion, or identity confusion, is a lack of clarity and consistency in one's perception of the self, which produces a high degree of anxiety.

identity2

a nursing outcome from the Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC) defined as: distinguishes between self and nonself and characterizes one's essence. See also Nursing Outcomes Classification.

identity

Psychiatry A person's global role in life and perception of a sense of self. See Core identity, Gender identity Social medicine A sense of individuality including one's distinct personality, talents, abilities, and flaws.

i·den·ti·ty

(ī-den'ti-tē)
1. The sum of characteristics by which a person is recognized (by self and others).
2. A composite definition of the self that includes an interpersonal aspect (e.g., roles, relationships); an aspect of possibility or potential (i.e., who one might become) and a values-oriented aspect that provides a basis for choices and decisions, including self-esteem and self-concept, both in reflecting and being influenced by the society in which one functions.

i·den·ti·ty

(ī-den'ti-tē)
Summation of a person's internalized history of relationship with objects, his or her social role, and his or her perception of both; the experience of "I."

identity

the aggregate of characteristics by which an individual is recognized.
References in periodicals archive ?
institutions: (1) the number of identity theft incidents suffered or
Congress could assign specific minimum values--statutory damages--for each of the acts associated with identity theft.
One reason criminals get away with identity theft is that the victim doesn't check financial statements for mistakes.
Typical identity theft insurance policies reimburse victims up to $10,000 or $15,000 for the cost of notarizing affidavits, phone calls and sending certified mall to law enforcement agencies, businesses, credit grantors and credit agencies.
In addition to disposal laws, 10 state governments have passed legislation giving identity theft victims the power to freeze credit files and significantly affect how their critical information is accessed.
The FTC's report notes that credit card fraud was the most common form of identity theft in 2002, accounting for 42 percent of the complaints it received that year.
Some experts say you can never fully prevent identity theft, no matter how cautious you are.
Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on Technology, Terrorism, and Government Information, the FTC estimated that it will receive approximately 200,000 identity theft calls on its newly installed identity theft hotline.

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