identifier


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

i·den·ti·fi·er

(ī-den'ti-fī-ĕr)
A person or thing that establishes or marks the identity or specific nature of anything.
[L. Lat. identitas, identity, fr. L. idem, the same]

identifier

(ī-dĕn'tĭ-fī″ĕr)
A unique fact, finding, number, symbol, or word that specifies a person, place, or thing, esp. in a hospital.
References in periodicals archive ?
and Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) today sent a letter to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) requesting that CMS clarify its position on the inclusion of medical devices' device identifiers (DIs) on Medicare claim forms.
An ORCID identifier is associated with the researcher, not a place of employment or a particular field.
This means that the cable identifiers and test results for each project can be stored in one place and can be retrieved and used as often as needed.
Two main questions that should be asked in the face of the digital identifier are as follows: which of the available identifier systems are digital identifier systems?
Section 3 provides the system design details of the identifier based ad hoc protocol stack and architecture.
To address the issue of reliably identifying a document, the MISMO Universal Document Identifier Workgroup has developed and tested a "universal" (or standard) formula for identifying documents that can be utilized across the industry.
The EFF is concerned that these unique identifiers could be used to track consumer's online activity, but Tien did find some encouraging findings in the study, too.
The identifier assigned by the system information content, in the transaction
One Dodd-Frank provision that very few financial executives are aware of has to do with establishing a standard identifier for financial contracts passing between corporations and their bankers or investment companies--and not just with regard to swaps.
Both of these mission critical business practices rely heavily on the presence of a visual, numeric identifier on ID cards.
RFIDs used in supply chains are usually 'passive RFIDs'; they lack a battery or fuel cell to power the radio transceiver, instead emitting their respective identifier whenever in proximity to a reader.
Each LO and each metadata instance is identified (according to the base schema) by a pair composed of a Catalog element, which is the name of an identification or cataloging scheme, and an Entry element, which is the value of the identifier itself and belongs to the given catalog.