id


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id

 [id]
a freudian term used to describe that part of the personality which harbors the unconscious, instinctive impulses that lead to immediate gratification of primitive needs such as hunger, the need for air, the need to move about and relieve body tension, and the need to eliminate. Id impulses are physiologic and body processes, as opposed to the ego and superego, which are psychologic and social processes. The id is dominated by the pleasure principle and some gratification of the id impulses is necessary for survival of a person's personality.
id reaction a localized or generalized, sterile secondary skin eruption occurring in sensitized patients as a result of circulation of allergenic products from a primary site of infection; the morphology and site of the lesion vary.

ID

Abbreviation for infecting (or infective) dose. See: minimal infecting dose.

id

(id),
1. In psychoanalysis, one of three components of the psychic apparatus in the freudian structural framework, the other two being the ego and superego. It is completely in the unconscious realm, is unorganized, is the reservoir of psychic energy or libido, and is under the influence of the primary processes.
2. The total of all psychic energy available from the innate biologic hungers, appetites, bodily needs, drives, and impulses, in a newborn infant; through socialization this diffuse undirected energy becomes channeled in less egocentric and more socially responsive directions (development of the ego from the id).
[L. id, that]

id

(id) in psychoanalytic theory, the innate, unconscious, primitive aspect of the personality dominated by the pleasure principle and seeking immediate gratification.

id

(ĭd)
n.
In Freudian theory, the division of the psyche that is totally unconscious and serves as the source of instinctual impulses and demands for immediate satisfaction of primitive needs.

id

Etymology: L, it
1 (in freudian psychoanalysis) the part of the psyche, functioning in the unconscious, that is the source of instinctive energy, impulses, and drives. It is based on the pleasure principle and has strong tendencies toward self-preservation. Compare ego, superego.
2 the true unconscious.

ID

abbreviation for infectious disease.

id

In psychoanalysis, the set of uncoordinated instincts which are the source of unconscious and primitive urges and desires in humans.

id

Psychiatry The unconscious source–per the freudian construct of mental energies, libido, unstructured desires and drives. See Ego, Superego. Cf Id reaction.

id

(id)
1. psychoanalysis One of three components of the psychic apparatus in the freudian structural framework, the other two being the ego and superego. It is completely in the unconscious realm, is unorganized, is the reservoir of psychic energy or libido, and is under the influence of the primary processes.
2. The total of all psychic energy available from the innate biologic hungers, appetites, bodily needs, drives, and impulses in a newborn infant.
[L. id, that]

id

A Freudian term for that primitive part of our nature concerned with the pursuit of mainly physical and sexual gratification and unmoved by considerations of reason, logic or humanity. The id manifests the forces of the libido and the death wish, but is said to be the source of much of our psychic energy. Freud's choice of the term may have been a little prudish in its lack of specificity; id is a Latin rendering of the Greek es meaning it. See also FREUDIAN THEORY.

id

(id)
In psychoanalysis, one of three components of the psychic apparatus in the freudian structural framework, the other two being the ego and superego. It is completely in the unconscious realm, is unorganized, is the reservoir of psychic energy or libido, and is under the influence of the primary processes.
[L. id, that]

id (id),

n the part of the psyche functioning in the unconscious that is the source of instinctive energy, impulses, and drives. It is based on the pleasure principle and has strong tendencies toward self-preservation. The full taxonomy includes the id, the ego, and the superego.

ID

1. infective dose.
2. L-iditol dehydrogenase.

Id

idiotype.

id