iatrogenic transmission

i·at·ro·gen·ic trans·mis·sion

infectious agents transmitted to patients due to medical interference, such as transmission by contaminated needles.

i·at·ro·gen·ic trans·mis·sion

(ī-at'rō-jen'ik trans-mish'ŭn)
Transmission of infectious agents due to medical intervention (e.g., transmission by contaminated needles).

i·at·ro·gen·ic trans·mis·sion

(ī-at'rō-jen'ik trans-mish'ŭn)
Infectious agents transmitted to patients due to medical interference, such as transmission by contaminated needles.
References in periodicals archive ?
Widespread HCV infection in a population generally results from iatrogenic transmission or sharing of recreational drug injection equipment.
In humans, prion diseases can occur as a sporadic or inherited disease, or as a result of iatrogenic transmission.
The lack of any cases, to date, of iatrogenic transmission of pathogenic virus in recombinant therapeutics should by no means generate feelings of complacency.
Such a test might also be used to test medical instruments such as electrodes to prevent iatrogenic transmission, as well as to detect low levels of contamination in the food supply, such as bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in cattle and scrapie in sheep, Dr.
The most likely explanation is iatrogenic transmission during his hospital admissions; however, other possibilities cannot be excluded.
In this review, the presentation, pathology and incidence of CJD are examined, with particular reference to iatrogenic transmission.
D-Gen and Antec International anticipate that by combining their respective technologies and expertise, the collaboration will lead to advances in developing practical, user-friendly disinfection products that could substantially reduce the risks of iatrogenic transmission of human prion diseases," said Dr Vince Croud, Technology Manager, Antec International.
Early and accurate clinical diagnosis might reduce unnecessary procedures and prevent iatrogenic transmission by organ transplantation.
There are no clusters of incidence in naturally occurring disease, and there is apparently no naturally occurring human-to-human transmission, although iatrogenic transmission by corneal transplants, dural grafts, and human pituitary growth hormone is well described (6).
Iatrogenic transmission of CJD has been reported from corneal transplantation, implantation of dura mater or electrodes in the brain and use of contaminated surgical instruments.
His primary research interests are the pathogenesis of the prion disease with special emphasis on the risk of iatrogenic transmission.
This finding raises concerns about possible iatrogenic transmission of proteins and specifically prion proteins via reusable LMAs.