hysteresis


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hysteresis

 [his-tĕ-re´sis]
1. the failure of coincidence of two associated phenomena, such as that exhibited in the differing temperatures of gelation and of liquefaction of a reversible colloid.
2. a phenomenon exhibited by a physical system in which the system's response to an outside influence depends not only on the instantaneous magnitude of the influence but also on the system's previous history, as when a material undergoing cyclical loading exhibits a loss of energy between cycles of loading and unloading.
3. in cardiac pacing terminology, the number of pulses per minute below the programmed pacing rate that the heart must drop in order to cause initiation of pacing; it can be programmed in by a pulse generator.

hys·ter·e·sis

(his'ter-ē'sis),
1. Failure of either one of two related phenomena to keep pace with the other; or any situation in which the value of one depends on whether the other has been increasing or decreasing.
2. The lag of a magnetic effect behind its cause. Synonym(s): magnetic inertia
3. The temperature differential that exists when a substance, such as reversible hydrocolloid, melts at one temperature and solidifies at another.
4. The basis of a type of cooperativity observed in many enzyme-catalyzed reactions in which the degree of cooperativity is associated with a slow conformational change of the enzyme. Compare: allosterism, cooperativity.
5. The nonlinear nature of the pressure-volume curve of the lung in which transpulmonary pressure at a given volume during inflation is less than the transpulmonary pressure at the same volume during exhalation.
[G. hysterēsis, a coming later]

hysteresis

/hys·te·re·sis/ (his″tĕ-re´sis) [Gr.]
1. a time lag in the occurrence of two associated phenomena, as between cause and effect.
2. in cardiac pacemaker terminology, the number of pulses per minute below the programmed pacing rate that the heart must drop in order to cause initiation of pacing.

hysteresis

[his′tərē′sis]
Etymology: Gk, hysterein, to be late
1 a lagging or retardation of one of two associated phenomena or a failure to act in unison.
2 the influence of the previous condition or treatment of the body on its subsequent response to a given force, as in the elastic property of a lung. At any given lung volume the elastic recoil pressure within the airways during expiration is less than that which exists at the same lung volume during inspiration.

hys·ter·e·sis

(his'tĕr-ē'sis)
1. Failure of either one of two related phenomena to keep pace with the other; or any situation in which the value of one depends on whether the other has been increasing or decreasing.
2. The lag of a magnetic effect behind its cause.
3. The temperature differential that exists when a substance melts at one temperature and solidifies at another.
4. A type of cooperativity in enzyme-catalyzed reactions in which the degree of cooperativity is associated with a slow conformational change of the enzyme.
Compare: allosterism
[G. hysterēsis, a coming later]

hys·ter·e·sis

(his'tĕr-ē'sis)
Failure of either one of two related phenomena to keep pace with the other; or any situation in which the value of one depends on whether the other has been increasing or decreasing.
[G. hysterēsis, a coming later]

hysteresis

the failure of coincidence of two associated phenomena, such as that exhibited in the differing temperatures of gelation and of liquefaction of a reversible colloid.
References in periodicals archive ?
This test indicated that hysteresis was evident under all four conditions.
The experiments show that for saturated dielectric hysteresis loops the increase of the electric field frequency results in a decrease of reversible polarization values, which obeys the exponential rule (Fig.
The value of the heat generation rate is calculated from the area of the hysteresis loop, the size of which, in turn, has a functional dependence on time, as shown above (Fig.
Similarly, the width of the hysteresis is made programmable by implementing the current source cell as a current mirror with adjustable gain for its IHYST output.
Hysteresis and CCT differ in that CCT is usually similar between eyes, whereas CH can differ between eyes, and can change with changes in IOR The Ocular Hypertension Treatment study identified that African Americans have thinner corneas when compared to Caucasians, (17) and the Los Angeles Latino Eye Study (LALES) demonstrated the same findings comparing Hispanics to Caucasians.
Adaptive Hysteresis Band Controlled Grid connected PV System With Active Filter Function' IEEE Conference on Power Engineering and Renewable Energy, pp:1-6.
Also the friction of the ball joints forms stiff series rigidity with respect to the hysteresis of the rubber bushings.
The larger the fc, the more serious the hysteresis energy loss.
Concomitantly, the contact angle hysteresis values and adhesive force between coating and substrate decreased.
While at Cambridge, he developed several important types of apparatus for measuring permeability and hysteresis.
In this research, the response of polarization, susceptibility and hysteresis of ferroelectric thin films to the variation of temperature, stress, electric field and the content of non-ferroelectric impurities was addressed through a Monte Carlo simulation.
The self-oscillating control method uses a comparator with either hysteresis [7], [8] or zero-hysteresis [9].