hypostatic


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

hypostatic

 [hi″po-stat´ik]
1. pertaining to, due to, or associated with hypostasis.
2. pertaining to certain inherited traits that are particularly liable to be suppressed by other traits; see epistasis.

hy·po·stat·ic

(hī'pō-stat'ik),
1. resulting from a dependent position.
2. Relating to hypostasis.

hypostatic

/hy·po·stat·ic/ (hi″po-stat´ik)
1. pertaining to, due to, or associated with hypostasis.
2. pertaining to certain inherited traits that are particularly liable to be suppressed by other traits.

hypostatic

[-stat′ik]
Etymology: Gk, hypo + stasis, standing still
pertaining to an accumulation of deposits of substances or congestion in a body area that results from a lack of activity.

hy·po·stat·ic

(hī'pō-stat'ik)
1. Sedimentary; resulting from a dependent position.
2. Relating to hypostasis.

hypostatic

1. pertaining to, due to, or associated with hypostasis.
2. abnormally static; said of certain inherited traits that are liable to be suppressed by other traits.
References in periodicals archive ?
These words are to be read as the possibility of a Transcendence that has radically sacrificed itself to the point of no longer resembling a hypostatic Uno.
Voegelin does not interpret either the Caesarea Philippi or Colossians passage to mean that either Peter or the Evangelist believed that Christ was anything as static or thing-like as a hypostatic union of divine and human natures, or God and man.
However, what cannot be overlooked is the fact that for Bruno the images employed in any theory making were indeed living images, and not static iconic representations of the objects of the external world, or of elements from the hypostatic domain of ideas and abstractions.
Tennyson's focus (like Lyell's) is the moral, spiritual side of humanity that looks to Christ as an examplar for conduct; yet his voice remains puzzled, especially over the hypostatic union, the way the incarnation unites the natural and supernatural.
Complications such as hypostatic pneumonia and pressure sores may develop, resulting in accelerated debility.
In it the 'division or confusion in the hypostatic union of the two natures of the person manifested individually' is condemned, a union 'that surpasses understanding and is ineffable and unknowable.
The fragments are then projected onto a hypostatic grid of intelligibility composed of a plane of oppositional threads such as the matter/anti-matter antimony.
For example, Kimberly Benston transforms unnaming into an epistemological condition capable of sustaining an ethics of self-creation, in which "dreams of the hypostatic experience that simultaneously names and unnames itself" resolves into a stance capable of taking "responsibility for the rhythms of self by reconciling them with the intolerable music of [one's] familial past" ("I Yam" 164, 169).
The sacrament, rather than an accident veiling an inward substance or, as for Luther, a consubstantial manifestation of the hypostatic union, is instead an Augustinian seal ratifying a sacramental reality solely in the heart or soul of the communicant.
The volume is divided into eleven chapters that treat the following themes: proofs for God's existence and the divine attributes; religious language; divine knowledge and agency; the Trinity; human nature, including the immortality of the soul and the freedom of the will; predestination and merit; grace and sin; Jesus; the hypostatic union and Christ's saving work; Mary; and the sacraments.
Barth's central point of reference, both in the Gottingen Dogmatics and in the Church Dogmatics, is the Christology of Protestant orthodoxy(113) which, as I suggest, is indebted to John of Damascus, who was not only a compiler of a yet older patristic tradition, but also archieved an original synthesis in which the Chalcedonian Christology of two natures in one hypostasis was combined with the radical asymmetry of the hypostatic union of the divine and the human nature in the hypostasis of the Son of God, the second person of the Trinity(*).
Hypostatic ulcers in 47, XXY Klinefelter's syndrome.