hypostatic


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Related to hypostatic: hypostatic congestion, hypostatic pneumonia

hypostatic

 [hi″po-stat´ik]
1. pertaining to, due to, or associated with hypostasis.
2. pertaining to certain inherited traits that are particularly liable to be suppressed by other traits; see epistasis.

hy·po·stat·ic

(hī'pō-stat'ik),
1. resulting from a dependent position.
2. Relating to hypostasis.

hypostatic

/hy·po·stat·ic/ (hi″po-stat´ik)
1. pertaining to, due to, or associated with hypostasis.
2. pertaining to certain inherited traits that are particularly liable to be suppressed by other traits.

hypostatic

[-stat′ik]
Etymology: Gk, hypo + stasis, standing still
pertaining to an accumulation of deposits of substances or congestion in a body area that results from a lack of activity.

hy·po·stat·ic

(hī'pō-stat'ik)
1. Sedimentary; resulting from a dependent position.
2. Relating to hypostasis.

hypostatic

1. pertaining to, due to, or associated with hypostasis.
2. abnormally static; said of certain inherited traits that are liable to be suppressed by other traits.
References in periodicals archive ?
Voegelin does not interpret either the Caesarea Philippi or Colossians passage to mean that either Peter or the Evangelist believed that Christ was anything as static or thing-like as a hypostatic union of divine and human natures, or God and man.
This understanding of astrology arises out of the context of Bruno's "nova philosophia," which pushed hermetic reason to its furthest degree by disassembling the ontological hierarchy that placed the hypostatic Uno at the highest point of the scale and matter at the lowest.
Measures such as chest physiotherapy to prevent hypostatic pneumonia and frequent changing of position, together with the use of water beds and egg crate mattresses to prevent pressure sores, are necessary.
The first stanza's suggestion that Luther was as mistaken as his Roman foes when it comes to sacramental theology is reiterated at the center of the poem where "Impanation" (line 25), the Lutheran view of sacramental presence based on the hypostatic union of the Incarnation, is explicitly rejected.
Finally, His Divinity is present, because of the hypostatic union of the Divine nature in the person of Christ, with His Body, Blood and Soul.
But the human words he speaks are, by virtue of the hypostatic union, divine words, and so they enjoy the inherent effectiveness that is proper to the divine word: "Who then is this, who commands even the winds and the sea, and they obey him?
Stated differently, Teilhard envisioned a cosmic Christ who is the hypostatic center--the Alpha and Omega--of the whole evolutionary process.
A master both of detail and of the big picture, he found the "key to history" in religion--the fact that, as he believed, human beings are naturally religious--and ultimately in the central dogma of Catholicism, in the unique balance of spiritual and material brought about by the Hypostatic Union.
What is not natural about it is its idiosyncratic, radically hypostatic style.
A coupling of Love and Beauty, then, whose philosophical function was that of opening up new worlds that were to be viewed with a gaze which had the ability to perceive at once the real of the material world and the unreal of the hypostatic world.
An elaborate benedictory prayer for the Prophet Muhammad--or, rather, his apotheosis, the hypostatic "Muhammadan Reality," the first existent/intellect and veritable Spirit of prophecy--it is reportedly attested in a manuscript preserved at the library of the Zaytunah Mosque in Tunis, which, as far as I have been able to determine, has never been cited by a Western scholar.
And, on a hypostatic level, what is the meaning behind the meaning?