hypometria


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Related to hypometria: Dysdiadochokinesia, hypermetria

hypometria

 [hi″po-me´tre-ah]
ataxia in which movements fall short of the intended goal.

hy·po·met·ri·a

(hī'pō-mē'trē-ă),
Ataxia characterized by underreaching an object or goal; seen with cerebellar disease. Compare: hypermetria.
[hypo- + G. metron, measure]

hypometria

/hy·po·me·tria/ (-me´tre-ah) ataxia in which movements fall short of the intended goal.

hypometria

[hī′pōmē′trē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, hypo + metron, measure
an abnormal form of dysmetria characterized by a dysfunction of the power to control the range of muscular action, resulting in movements that fall short of the intended goals of the affected individual. Compare hypermetria.

hy·po·me·tri·a

(hī'pō-mē'trē-ă)
Ataxia characterized by underreaching an object or goal; seen with cerebellar disease.
Compare: hypermetria
[hypo- + G. metron, measure]

dysmetria, ocular

Abnormality of eye movements in which the eyes overshoot (hypermetria) or undershoot (hypometria) when attempting to fixate an object. It could be a sign of cerebellar disease, ocular motor nerve paresis, myasthenia gravis, internuclear ophthalmoplegia (overshoot of the eye contralateral to the lesion), etc. See flutter; opsoclonus.

hypometria

ataxia in which movements fall short of the intended goal.
References in periodicals archive ?
The main abnormality consists of saccade hypometria, although all types (predictive, anticipatory, and memory-guided) of saccade generation may be involved [24].
In a recent study of oculomotor function in thirty patients with MSA, (8) excessive square-wave jerks were observed in 21 of the patients, a mild supranuclear gaze palsy in eight patients, a gaze-evoked nystagmus in 12 patients, a positioning down-beat nystagmus in 10 out of 25 patients, mild-moderate saccadic hypometria in 22 patients, impaired smooth pursuit movements in 28 patients, and reduced vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) suppression in 16 out of 24 patients.
Hence, particularly useful in separating MSA from other Parkinsonian syndromes is the presence in the former of excessive square-wave jerks, mild to moderate hypometria of saccades, impaired vestibule-ocular reflex (VOR), and nystagmus.