hypoglycemic agent


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hypoglycemic agent

any of various synthetic drugs that lower the blood glucose level and are used to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus. They may stimulate synthesis of insulin by pancreatic beta cells, inhibit glucose production, facilitate transport of glucose to muscle cells, and sometimes increase the number of receptor sites where insulin can be bound and can initiate the process of breaking down glucose. Most are sulfonylureas, including acetoHEXAMIDE, chlorproPAMIDE, glipiZIDE, TOLAZamide, and TOLBUTamide. Patients should be advised that these drugs are not a cure for diabetes but only a means of controlling it and that it is important to continue to comply with dietary and exercise prescriptions.

hy·po·gly·ce·mic a·gent

(hī'pō-glī-sē'mik ā'jĕnt)
Oral medications used in the management of Type 2 diabetes mellitus, but ineffective in Type 1 diabetes.
References in periodicals archive ?
The preparations were taken alone, or concurrently with oral hypoglycemic agents, with or without insulin.
Among the subjects, 44 patients were on oral hypoglycemic agents, 16 had been on insulin therapy for at least 5 years and 40 were on oral hypoglycemics as well as insulin therapy.
All subjects maintained their usual diabetes therapy which consisted of the oral hypoglycemic agents sulfonylurea and/or metformin.
Dhulkotia JS, Ola B, Fraser R, Farrell Z Oral hypoglycemic agents us insulin in management of gestational diabetes: a systematic review and metaanalysis.
DISCUSSION: Oral hypoglycemic agents involved in drug induced hypoglycemic coma (DIHC) are: gliclazide, glibenclamide, metformin, repaglinide, glimepiride and buformin.
potent hypoglycemic agent in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats from Swertia japonica.
Crouch studied 73 similar patients, who were also on hypoglycemic agents and no exogenous insulin.
0%) were randomly assigned to receive, in double-blind fashion, 600 [mu]g per day of chromium (as chromium picolinate) plus 2 mg per day of biotin or placebo for 90 days, along with their usual oral hypoglycemic agent.
Chlorpropamide, used as the standard hypoglycemic agent in this study, is a member of the 'first-generation' sulphonylureas.
One-quarter of patients were treated by diet alone, 12% with an oral hypoglycemic agent alone, and 37% with an oral hypoglycemic agent plus insulin.