hypoglossal nerve


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Related to hypoglossal nerve: glossopharyngeal nerve

hypoglossal

 [hi″po-glos´al]
hypoglossal nerve the twelfth cranial nerve; its modality is purely motor, serving the intrinsic muscles of the tongue and other muscles beneath the tongue. See Appendix 3-5.

hypoglossal nerve

n.
Either of the 12th pair of cranial nerves that innervate the muscles of the tongue.

hypoglossal nerve

Etymology: Gk, hypo + glossa, tongue
either of a pair of cranial nerves essential for swallowing and for moving the tongue. Each nerve has four major branches, communicates with the vagus nerve, and arises from nucleus XII in the brain. Also called nervus hypoglossus, twelfth cranial nerve.
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Hypoglossal nerve assessment

hypoglossal nerve

the 12th CRANIAL NERVE of higher vertebrates, the motor nerve supplying the floor of the mouth and the tongue.
References in periodicals archive ?
We referred the patient to the neurology department under a suspicion of left hypoglossal nerve palsy.
Hypoglossal nerve stimulation improves obstructive sleep apnea: 12-month outcomes.
In our study, acute unilateral stimulation of the hypoglossal nerve during sleep in patients with obstructive sleep apnea resulted in progressive increases in inspiratory airflow with increasing stimulation intensity, and inspiratory flow limitation was completely eliminated in the majority of patients," said Dr.
Dissections of five modern human cadavers also yielded no indication that larger hypoglossal canals carry thicker hypoglossal nerves.
Therefore, it is most critical to assess the patient's tongue movement and swallow which reflect function of cranial nerve XI, the hypoglossal nerve, and cranial nerve X, the vagus nerve.
Targeted Hypoglossal Neurostimulation (THN) Sleep Therapy delivers neurostimulation to the hypoglossal nerve and thereby increases the muscle tone of key tongue muscles, preventing the tongue from collapsing into the upper airway during sleep.
The difficulties in exposing this foramen are created by its deep location and the surrounding vital structures, such as the carotid artery anteriorly, the hypoglossal nerve medially, the facial nerve laterally and the vertebral artery inferiorly.
Examination also revealed paralysis of the left hypoglossal nerve and the left glossopharyngeal nerve.
One patient had transient recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy, while one patient suffered from a transient palsy of the right hypoglossal nerve with persisting dysgeusia.
Therapeutic electrical stimulation of the hypoglossal nerve in obstructive sleep apnea.