hypocapnia


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Related to hypocapnia: hypercapnia

hypocapnia

 [hi″po-kap´ne-ah]
deficiency of carbon dioxide in the blood; it results from hyperventilation and eventually leads to alkalosis. Called also hypocarbia. adj., adj hypocap´nic.

hy·po·cap·ni·a

(hī'pō-kap'nē-ă),
Abnormally decreased arterial carbon dioxide tension.
Synonym(s): hypocarbia
[hypo- + G. kapnos, smoke, vapor]

hypocapnia

/hy·po·cap·nia/ (-kap´ne-ah) deficiency of carbon dioxide in the blood.hypocap´nic

hypocapnia

[-kap′nē·ə]
an abnormally low arterial carbon dioxide level. Also called hypocarbia.

hypocapnia

Decreased CO2 or bicarbonate in blood. Hypocapnia, even when marked, is normally well tolerated; transient induction of hypocapnia can lead to life-saving physiologic changes in patients with severe intracranial hypertension or neonatal pulmonary-artery hypertension, but hypocapnia of longer duration in critically ill patients adversely affects outcomes. Prophylactic induction of hypocapnia has no clinical role.

hypocapnia

↓ Arterial CO2

hy·po·cap·ni·a

(hī'pō-kap'nē-ă)
Abnormally decreased arterial carbon dioxide tension.
Synonym(s): hypocarbia.
[hypo- + G. kapnos, smoke, vapor]

hypocapnia

Reduced amounts of carbon dioxide in the blood, as after HYPERVENTILATION.

hypocapnia

lower than normal partial pressure (tension) of carbon dioxide ( P CO2) in the lung alveoli and in the arterial blood, hence respiratory alkalosis. If severe, can cause dizziness or confusion (by constrictive effect on brain blood vessels, reducing blood flow), disturbances of sensation and tetany (by reducing ionized calcium in the blood). See also hyperventilation.

hypocapnia

abnormally low blood levels of bicarbonate (HCO3-) and reduced buffer activity

hy·po·cap·ni·a

(hī'pō-kap'nē-ă)
Abnormally decreased arterial carbon dioxide tension.
Synonym(s): hypocarbia.
[hypo- + G. kapnos, smoke, vapor]

hypocapnia (hī´pōkap´nēə),

n a deficiency of carbon dioxide in the blood.

hypocapnia

diminished carbon dioxide in the blood.
References in periodicals archive ?
This assumption is based the findings of our previous study, which suggested hypocapnia as the main factor underlying the decrease in both ocular blood flows during exhaustive exercise (Ikemura and Hayashi, 2012b).
When this is combined with the hypocapnia, the pregnant woman ends up with a near normal or somewhat alkalotic pH.
Nasal mechanical ventilation is used to induce hypocapnia and hence central apnoea.
Arterial blood gas analysis showed hypoxemia and mild hypocapnia (Pa[O.
Whittaker JL (2008) Ultrasound imaging of the lateral abdominal wall muscles in individuals with lumbopelvic pain and signs of concurrent hypocapnia.
Hypocapnia as a result of accelerated respiratory rate secondary to severe metabolic acidosis leads to cerebral vasoconstriction and results in hypoxia.
It is well known that PAH is commonly associated with abnormal arterial blood gases, with mild-to-moderate hypoxemia and mild-to-moderate hypocapnia, as expression of increased intrapulmonary shunt, of the impairment in alveolar capillary oxygen diffusion and oxygen delivery and of the consequent hyperventilation present already at rest.
Routine hypocapnia is associated with a worse neurological outcome and is therefore not recommended.
i) abnormal patterns of hypocapnia due to altered central and peripheral chemo-receptor drive, and altered cortical input (Gardner, 2004; Jack, Rossiter, Pearson, & Ward, 2004).
The technique involves having the patient learn exercises that reduce both the frequency and the depth of breathing, to induce hypocapnia and reduce minute ventilation.
To avoid hypocapnia despite hyperventilation, the device features a two-way piston valve connected to a rebreathing bag.
Today, ICP monitoring is ubiquitous in any neurocritical care unit or intensive care unit (ICU), where patients are at higher risk for secondary brain injury because of cerebral edema, changes in cerebral blood flow, and hydrocephalus as well as secondary ischemia from hypotension, hypoxia, hypocapnia, hypercapnia, and fever (Miller, 2012; Wolfe & Torbey, 2009).