hypnotic


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Related to hypnotic: Hypnotic drugs

hypnotic

 [hip-not´ik]
1. causing sleep; called also somniferous.
2. an agent that causes sleep; called also somnifacient.
3. pertaining to or of the nature of hypnosis or hypnotism.

hyp·not·ic

(hip-not'ik),
1. Causing sleep.
2. An agent that promotes sleep. Synonym(s): soporific (2)
3. Relating to hypnotism.
[G. hypnōtikos, causing one to sleep]

hypnotic

/hyp·not·ic/ (hip-not´ik)
1. inducing sleep.
2. an agent that induces sleep.
3. pertaining to or of the nature of hypnosis or hypnotism.

hypnotic

(hĭp-nŏt′ĭk)
adj.
1.
a. Of or relating to hypnosis.
b. Of or relating to hypnotism.
2. Inducing or tending to induce sleep; soporific: read the bedtime story in a hypnotic voice.
n.
1.
a. A person who is hypnotized.
b. A person who can be hypnotized.
2. An agent that causes sleep; a soporific.

hyp·not′i·cal·ly adv.

hypnotic

[hipnot′ik]
Etymology: Gk, hypnos, sleep
one of a class of drugs often used as sedatives. See also hypnagogue.

hypnotic

adjective
1. Relating to hynosis.
2. Inducing sleep.
3. Referring to a trance-like state.
4. Relating to a hypnotic agent noun An agent that induces hypnosis, trance state or sleep; a sedative or CNS depressant, of which benzodiazepines is a drug of choice for 'primary' insomnia; short-acting hypnotics–eg, triazolam and oxazolam are used to induce sleep; to maintain sleep throughout the night, long-acting hypnotics–eg, flurazepam, are used.

hyp·not·ic

(hip-not'ik)
1. Causing sleep.
2. An agent that promotes sleep.
3. Relating to hypnotism.
[G. hypnōtikos, causing one to sleep]

hypnotic

Any drug or agent that induces sleep. There are various classes of hypnotic drugs. These include acylic ureides; alcohols; amides; barbiturates; benzodiazepines; carbamates; CHLORAL derivatives; quinazolone derivatives; piperidineduines; and certain ANTIHISTAMINES.

Hypnotic

A medication that makes a person sleep.

hyp·not·ic

(hip-not'ik)
1. Causing sleep.
2. An agent that promotes sleep.
3. Relating to hypnotism.
[G. hypnōtikos, causing one to sleep]

hypnotic (hipnot´ik),

n 1. a drug that induces sleep or depresses the central nervous system at a cortical level.
adj 2. causing sleep or a trance. See also sedative.

hypnotic

1. pertaining to or inducing hypnosis or sleep.
2. an agent that induces sleep.
References in periodicals archive ?
com representatives will represent the Hypnotic Vehicle Accessories for the following 2 years using these materials and will also actively follow up with any manufacturers and marketers that display an interest in potentially licensing the invention.
Hypnotic Stag, the 4-7 favourite, took two lengths out of his field between the first and second bends with a stunning injection of raw speed.
Study participants who took sleeping pills were matched with control patients of similar ages, gender and health who received no hypnotics in order to eliminate the possibility that other factors led to the results.
None of these patients had received any hypnotic or anxiolytic prescription in the 12 months before their new prescription.
A practitioner and trainer in psychotherapy and neuro-linguistic programming, Burton explores hypnotic language, which involves structuring sentences in such a way as to invite the reader or listener into a trance state, from several perspectives, but primarily cognitive.
It was stated in the article, but somewhat lost in the media frenzy that followed, that many patients with these episodes of sleep driving had taken the hypnotic incorrectly or mixed it with alcohol.
He presented a randomized, multicenter trial in which 64 older patients with hypnotic-dependent insomnia were assigned to one of three treatment strategies: gradual weaning from their hypnotic drugs, placebo biofeedback followed by gradual weaning from hypnotics, or eight sessions of behavioral therapy followed by weaning from hypnotics.
Hypnotic has plenty to recommend him as he has already won two races at Lingfield over seven furlongs, and should find this longer distance to his liking.
These biological potentials are the basis for psychosomatic healing responses, hypnotic susceptibility, and placebo effects.