hyperviscosity syndrome


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hyperviscosity

 [hi″per-vis-kos´ĭ-te]
excessive viscosity, as of the blood.
hyperviscosity syndrome any of various syndromes associated with increased viscosity of the blood. One type is due to serum hyperviscosity and is characterized by spontaneous bleeding with neurologic and ocular disorders. Another type is characterized by polycythemia with retarded blood flow, organ congestion, reduced capillary perfusion, and increased cardiac effort. A third group includes conditions in which the deformability of erythrocytes is impaired, such as sickle cell anemia.

hy·per·vis·cos·i·ty syn·drome

a syndrome resulting from increased viscosity of the blood; an increase in serum proteins may be associated with bleeding from mucous membranes, retinopathy, and neurologic symptoms, and is sometimes seen in Waldenström macroglobulinemia and in multiple myeloma; an increased viscosity secondary to polycythemia may be associated with organ congestion and decreased capillary perfusion.

hyperviscosity syndrome

several syndromes associated with increased thickness and slowed flow rate of blood. One type, which results from serum hyperviscosity, is caused by is caused by increased proteins and is characterized by neurological and ocular disorders. Another type is polycythemia causing organ congestion, reduced capillary perfusion, and increased cardiac effort. A third group includes conditions in which the deformability of erythrocytes is impaired, such as sickle cell anemia.

hyperviscosity syndrome

Lab medicine A clinical condition caused by an abnormal sluggishness of blood flow through peripheral vessels, especially with serum IgM levels > 3 g/dL, which may trigger oronasal bleeding, blurred vision, headache, dizziness, vertigo, ataxia, encephalopathy, or altered consciousness Funduscopic exam Venous dilatation, "sausage formation" hemorrhages, exudates; serum viscosity correlates poorly with clinical findings among Pts, but correlates well in the same Pt. See Waldenström's macroglobulinemia.

hy·per·vis·cos·i·ty syn·drome

(hīpĕr-vis-kosi-tē sindrōm)
Disorder due to increased viscosity of the blood; an increase in serum proteins may be associated with bleeding from mucous membranes, retinopathy, and neurologic symptoms, and is sometimes seen in Waldenström macroglobulinemia and in multiple myeloma.

hyperviscosity

excessive viscosity, as of the blood.

hyperviscosity syndrome
increased viscosity of the blood occurs with IgM and IgA myelomas because of the high levels of macroglobulins; causes increased resistance to blood, hypoxia, organ failure, retinal lesions, abnormalities in platelet function, coagulation defects and cardiac failure.
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Hyperviscosity syndrome secondary to the neoplastic process is the most probable cause for the claw abnormalities that occurred with this patient.
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Initially a hyperviscosity syndrome secondary to polycythaemia was considered and a haematologist was consulted.
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A 79-year old Chinese woman presented with blurred vision due to hyperviscosity syndrome and bleeding tendency.
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