hypertrophic pyloric stenosis


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hy·per·tro·phic py·lor·ic ste·no·sis

muscular hypertrophy of the pyloric sphincter, associated with projectile vomiting appearing during the first few weeks after birth, more commonly seen in boys.

hypertrophic pyloric stenosis

Pediatrics A condition affecting neonates, primarily boys, in the 1st few wks after hatching Pathogenesis Defect in pyloric relaxation and pylorospasm Clinical Gastric outlet obstruction, projectile bile-free vomiting, metabolic alkalosis, dehydration

hy·per·tro·phic py·lor·ic ste·no·sis

(hī'pĕr-trō'fik pī-lōr'ik stĕ-nō'sis)
Muscular hypertrophy of the pyloric sphincter, associated with projectile vomiting beginning in the second or third week of life, usually in males.
Synonym(s): congenital pyloric stenosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
The preferred diagnostic approach for suspected Infantile Hypertrophic Pyloric Stenosis (IHPS) is a debatable topic, with different investigators discussing the cost-effectiveness and merits of available radiological investigations14.
Increased insulin-like growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor system in the pyloric muscle in infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis.
An analysis of feeding regimens after pyloromyotomy for hypertrophic pyloric stenosis.
Comparison of postpyloromyotomy feeding regimens in infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis.
There are a number of intestinal motility disorders in which defects in innervation and loss or structural alteration of ICCs have been reported, for example, hypertrophic pyloric stenosis, Hirschsprung disease, intestinal pseudo-obstruction, and slow-transit constipation.
Smooth muscle cell hypertrophy versus hyperplasia in infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis.
Infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis related to ingestion of erythromycin estolate: a report of five cases.
Infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis occurs more often in boys then in a girls, and is rare in children older than 6 months (3).
If the abdominal radiograph is nonspecific, high obstruction or gastroesophageal reflux could still explain the symptom profile, making a UGI in order--with the caveat that ultrasound is a more specific test for hypertrophic pyloric stenosis.
Of those 157, those who developed infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis were younger when first given the antibiotic than were those who did not develop the disorder (mean 9.
The myenteric plexus of the pylorus: Rs early normal development and its changes in hypertrophic pyloric stenosis.
The incidence of infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis in macrolide-treated infants varies from 4.

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