hypertext


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hypertext

A link—typically displayed as (blue) coloured, underlined text—incorporated in an electronic document that permits internet browsers to immediately open another document in the same or another website.
References in periodicals archive ?
As a means of explaining hypertext reading, Foltz, proposes that a "narrative schema" can explain how readers approach hypertexts as a particular type of text.
The treatment instruction, HyperLyme, is a 50-page, four-layer hypertext program, the elements of which include text, graphics/photos, audios, and videos.
As described, the most basic property of hypertext is its capacity to create links within and among texts.
Above all, the necessity of designing locally coherent hypertext nodes makes it more difficult for learners to build interrelations between single nodes.
A) The hypertext novel gives readers a spatial model of narrative.
of using hypertext for instruction may be settled in part through an
Hypertext Markup Language (HTML): The coding language used to create hypertext documents for use on the Web.
This hypertext linkage allows a reader to quickly skim any of the AnchorPage-generated synopses for items of interest and to call up the pertinent document with the click of a mouse.
Much of the work done in hypertext has been confined to certain academic circles and in on-line computer networks like the Sausalito-based WELL (Whole Earth 'Lectroruc Link).
With hypertext and multimedia documents, users have the power to custom design journeys through each book or document, escaping from the tyranny of pagination, linear progression, and all that dull plodding from chapter to chapter.
One technique that has been used successfully for information-intensive text is hypertext programming.
today pre-announced TrueLinks and TrueForms, hypertext enhancements designed to neutralize so-called "post-click fraud" brought about by clicking on deceptive links and submitting deceptive forms.