hyperpyrexia


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hyperpyrexia

 [hi″per-pi-rek´se-ah]
hyperthermia. adj., adj hyperpyrex´ial, hyperpyrex´ic.
malignant hyperpyrexia malignant hyperthermia.

hy·per·py·rex·i·a

(hī'pĕr-pī-rek'sē-ă),
Extremely high fever.
[hyper- + G. pyrexis, feverishness]

hyperpyrexia

/hy·per·py·rex·ia/ (-pi-rek´se-ah) hyperthermia.hyperpyrex´ialhyperpyret´ic
malignant hyperpyrexia  see under hyperthermia.

hyperpyrexia

(hī′pər-pī-rĕk′sē-ə)
n.
Abnormally high fever.

hy′per·py·rex′i·al, hy′per·py·ret′ic (-rĕt′ĭk) adj.

hyperpyrexia

[hī′pərpīrek′sē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, hyper + pyressein, to be feverish
an extremely elevated temperature that sometimes occurs in acute infectious diseases, especially in young children. Malignant hyperpyrexia, characterized by a rapid rise in temperature, tachycardia, tachypnea, sweating, rigidity, and blotchy cyanosis, occasionally occurs in patients undergoing general anesthesia. A high temperature may be reduced by sponging the body with tepid water, by giving a tepid tub bath, or by administering antipyretic medication, such as aspirin or acetaminophen. See also fever. hyperpyretic, adj.

hy·per·py·rex·i·a

(hī'pĕr-pī-rek'sē-ă)
Extremely high fever.
[hyper- + G. pyrexis, feverishness]

hyperpyrexia

Body temperature above 41.1 C (106 F). Hyperpyrexia calls for urgent treatment to lower the temperature, if permanent brain damage is to be avoided.

hyperpyrexia

excessively high fever; hyperthermia.
See also fever (1).

malignant hyperpyrexia
see porcine stress syndrome.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hyperpyrexia associated with sustained muscle contractions: An alternative diagnosis to central fever.
Contraction of opposing muscle groups tends to generate heat at a greater rate than can be lost by vasodilatation and sweating, leading to hyperpyrexia and cardiovascular instability.
Surgery: intrauterine vascular interference to the small bowels of dogs in studying the pathogenesis and treatment of small bowel atresia and the initiation of intrauterine management of certain congenital anomalies; study of anatomy and successful separation of conjoined twins; developments in burn management; peripheral vascular disease and one of the earliest developments of plethysmography; studies in portal hypertension and sclerotherapy; bile duct carcinoma and liver transplantation in animals and humans; the elucidation of the cause of malignant hyperpyrexia and its successful treatment; and, of course, the climactic heart transplantation and associated work in immunology.
Seizures, agitation, trauma, and hyperpyrexia may also play a role.
Hospitalization is mandatory in cases of hyperpyrexia, prolonged vomiting, severe dehydration, tachycardia, tachypnea, hypotension and other symptoms related to urosepsis.
A 54-year-old male patient was hospitalized with hyperpyrexia, chills, general weakness, and dysuria for one week.
Antipyretic activity was evaluated by yeast- induced hyperpyrexia in rats.
The healthy participants were selected from infertile couples who underwent treatment with assisted-reproduction technology for diagnosed female factor infertility and in which the man was normozoospermic according to WHO guidelines (16) and had no hyperpyrexia, malignancy, autoimmune disorders, sexually transmitted diseases, inflammation of the reproductive organs, or family history of genetic diseases.
Diminished or missing sweat glands cause heat intolerance and hyperpyrexia.
6°F or 42°C resulting in hyperpyrexia.
in vitro and also inhibited castor oil-induced diarrhea in rats (Mazumder, et al, 2006); unripe fruit extract demonstrated gastroprotective effect against gastric mucosal damage in rats induced by absolute ethanol, as well as inhibited castor oil-induced intestinal transit and accumulation of intestinal fluids in mice (Dhuley, 2003); anti-inflammatory, anti-pyretic and analgesic properties of leaf extract as demonstrated by inhibition of carrageenan-induced paw edema and cotton-pellet granuloma in rats, reduction of early and late phases of paw licking in mice, and reduction of hyperpyrexia in rats (Arul, et al, 2005); inhibition of castor oil-induced diarrhea in mice by aqueous and methanolic extracts of unripe fruits (Shoba, 2001).
A post-mortem revealed that he had died of hyperpyrexia caused my the ingestion of the ecstasy ingredient MDMA.