hyperpronation

hyperpronation

excess foot/lower-limb pronation; characteristic of lower-limb malalignments, e.g. forefoot varus and supinatus, rearfoot varus and valgus, genu valgum and varum, coxa valgum and varum
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2,11) Intrinsic factors include high body mass index (BMI), female sex, excessive internal and external hip rotation, hyperpronation, and hyper plantar flexion.
This is followed by hyperpronation which displaces the head medially, and the subsequent flexion of the elbow entraps the biceps tendon around the neck.
Sundry biomechanical issues such as hyperpronation or forefoot valgus or varus, which may contribute to the condition can be addressed by suitable orthoses with, if necessary, appropriate posting.
Frequently, iliotibial band problems are associated with biomechanical dysfunction, either around the hip girdle, including weakness of the hip abductors and extensors, or possibly even more distally, an inflexibility of the calf and Achilles, as well as problems with hyperpronation.
Effect of Feet Hyperpronation on Pelvic Alignment in a Standing Position Gait Posture.
Incidence of hyperpronation in the ACL injured knee: a clinical perspective.
A comparison of supination/flexion to hyperpronation in the reduction of radial head subluxations.
Look also for bilateral hyperpronation and heel cord tightness.
Hyperpronation of the subtalar joint is one of the risk factors to ACL injury, because this condition is accompanied with internal tibial rotation (Bonci, 1999).
This applied to the study because hyperpronation has been found to be more serious than either pronation or supination.
However, the results of two randomized trials comparing supination with hyperpronation suggest that hyperpronation is superior.
This can be accomplished with a multilayered, total contact orthosis with adequate arch support, and possibly a medial hindfoot "wedge", and/or a medial forefoot post to address hyperpronation.