hypermobile foot

hypermobile foot

greater than normal range of foot joint movements (e.g. associated with non-rigid pes cavus; general hypermobility syndrome; see Table 1)
Table 1: The major and minor diagnostic criteria of benign familial joint hypermobility syndrome (BFJHS)
Major criteria
Current/historic Brighton score of 4/9
Arthralgia for >3/12 in four or more joints
Minor criteria
Current/historic Brighton score of 1, 2 or 3/9 (0, 1, 2, 3/9 if >50 years old)
Arthralgia for minimum of 3 months in 1-3 joints, or back pain for minimum of 3 months, or spondylosis/spondylolysis/spondylolisthesis
Dislocation/subluxation of > one joint, or one episode of simultaneous dislocation/subluxation of more than one joint
Three or more lesions of soft-tissue rheumatism (e.g. spondylitis, tenosynovitis, bursitis)
Marfanoid habitus (i.e. tall, slim physique, span:height ratio >1.3, upper:lower segment ratio <0.89, arachnodactyly [+Steinberg/wrist signs])
Abnormal skin: striae, hyperextensibility, thin skin, papyraceous scarring
Eye signs: drooping eyelids, myopia, antimongoloid slant
Varicose veins or hernia or uterine/rectal prolapse

Note: BFJHS is diagnosed in the presence of two major criteria, or one major and two minor criteria, or four minor criteria (adapted from Grahame R, Bird HA, Child A, Dolan AL, Fowler-Edwards A, Ferrell W, Gurley-Green S, Keer R, Mansi E, Murray K, Smith E. The British Society Special Interest Group on Heritable Disorders of Connective Tissue Criteria for the Benign Joint Hypermobility Syndrome. "The Revised (Brighton 1998) Criteria for the Diagnosis of the BJHS". Journal of Rheumatology 2000; 27:1777-1779).

References in periodicals archive ?
A flat, pes planus (low-arched) type foot which often hyperpronates is a loose, hypermobile foot susceptible to foot fatigue and overuse injuries, (ie, posterior tibial and/or Achilles tendonitis).