hyperlordosis

hy·per·lor·do·sis

(hī'pĕr-lōr-dō'sis),
Extreme lordosis.

hy·per·lor·do·sis

(hī'pĕr-lōr-dō'sis)
An abnormal anteriorly convex curvature of the spine, usually lumbar.

hy·per·lor·do·sis

(hī'pĕr-lōr-dō'sis)
An abnormal anteriorly convex curvature of the spine, usually lumbar.
References in periodicals archive ?
1,2] Predisposing factors include family history, repetitive microtraumas, and lumbar hyperlordosis.
C7-T1 anterior closing wedge bone-disc-bone osteotomy for the treatment of cervical hyperlordosis in muscular dystrophy: A new technique for correction of a rare deformity.
Reduced lumbar lordosis was found more often than hyperlordosis.
This difference can be explained by the study by Wilson and Frederick [20], which points out that defined body postures, such as cervical hyperlordosis and thoracic kyphosis, are associated with an anomalous head rotation, thus generating an increased distance from the hyoid bone to the mandibular symphysis.
To assess hyper kyphosis and hyperlordosis, a flexible 32 inch ruler (flexi curve) was used.
A significant characteristic to highlight was a noticeable lumbar hyperlordosis.
Ligamentous laxity, weight gain and hyperlordosis are common physical changes associated with pregnancy (Borg-Stein et al 2005) and physiotherapists must adapt their usual practice accordingly.
Standing wall hyperlordosis test was used for the evaluation of lumbar lordosis state.
Also among these young people can be found a number of problems related to an incorrect posture such as intervertebral cervical, dorsal or lumbar, limiting mobility and stability, hyperlordosis.
The first and most obvious sign of upper crossed syndrome is the characteristic postural dysfunction of protracted scapulae, medially rotated humeri, hyperkyphotic (overly flexed) upper thoracic spine, and a protracted/ anteriorly held head, which is created by hypolordosis or even kyphosis (excessive flexion) of the lower cervical spine, hyperlordosis (excessive extension) of the upper cervical spine and head, and anterior translation of the head upon the atlas (Table 2).
Sticking your bottom out If your bottom tends to stick out or you have a pronounced curve in your lower back, you may have hyperlordosis, which is an exaggerated inward curve in the lower back.
In most of the cases, the final result is a kyphoscoliosis with collapsing spine or, less frequently, a hyperlordosis or a lordoscoliosis with rigid spine [22, 24].