hyperlipidaemia


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hyperlipidaemia

An abnormal increase in the levels of fats (lipids), including cholesterol, in the blood. This may be of dietary origin or may be due to PANCREATITIS or bile system disorder or may be a dangerous familial disorder of dominant inheritance. Most people with familial hyperlipidaemia develop serious coronary artery disease before the age of 50.

hyperlipidaemia

an abnormally elevated plasma lipid level. A significant risk factor for coronary artery disease (ischaemic heart disease) which can be familial or acquired (largely through lifestyle, especially high-fat diet). The condition is asymptomatic and only diagnosed by a screening blood test or following a cardiac event. While treatment requires dietary modification, newer lipid-lowering drugs (statins) have led to much better results and a reduction in morbidity and mortality. See also cholesterol, lipids.

hyperlipidaemia

raised levels of total blood lipids (i.e. >10 g/dL)

hy·per·lip·id·e·mi·a

(hī'pĕr-lip'i-dē'mē-ă)
Elevated levels of lipids in the blood plasma.
Synonym(s): hyperlipidaemia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Baseline liver function tests are helpful in excluding cholestasis as a secondary cause of hyperlipidaemia.
Review of literature shows that hyperlipidaemia maybe a cause for tinnitus according to majority of the related studies.
In our study, the prevalence of hyperlipidaemia among females was 88.
Obstructive liver disease (bilirubin and alkaline phosphatase), hypothyroidism (thyroid-stimulating hormone [+ or -] free T4) and renal disease (creatinine, estimated glomerular filtration rate and urine dipstick/protein:creatinine ratio) are other important causes of secondary hyperlipidaemia.
9), (10), (11) In the present study, the prevalence of hyperlipidaemia in patients with BRVO was 18.
NCDs include all lifestyle-induced conditions such as CVD (cardiovascular disease), diabetes, hypertension and hyperlipidaemia (high cholesterol) that lead to health complications requiring hospitalisation and are life-threatening.
Although treatment for risk factors for CVD such as hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, obesity, and diabetes has steadily decreased mortality due to cardiovascular events in the last three decades, the underling mechanisms for several CVD remain elusive.
And an example of a familial disorder is hyperlipidaemia which is abnormally high levels of fat in the blood.
One of the issues associated the hyperlipidaemia is that it is a silent disease and although there are certain characteristics such as xanthelasma palpebrarum, which are yellowish patches consisting of cholesterol deposits above the eyelid more commonly observed with familial hypercholesterolaemia, it is only detectable with clinical investigation.
Low cholesterol dietary intake and adequate exercise is also necessary in the treatment of hyperlipidaemia.