hyperglycemia


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Related to hyperglycemia: hypoglycemia

hyperglycemia

 [hi″per-gli-se´me-ah]
excess of glucose in the blood; see also diabetes mellitus.

hy·per·gly·ce·mi·a

(hī'pĕr-glī-sē'mē-ă),
An abnormally high concentration of glucose in the circulating blood, seen especially in patients with diabetes mellitus.
Synonym(s): hyperglycosemia
[hyper- + G. glykys, sweet, + haima, blood]

hyperglycemia

/hy·per·gly·ce·mia/ (-gli-se´me-ah) abnormally increased content of glucose in the blood.

hyperglycemia

(hī′pər-glī-sē′mē-ə)
n.
The presence of an abnormally high concentration of glucose in the blood.

hy′per·gly·ce′mic (-mĭk) adj.

hyperglycemia

[hī′pərglīsē′mē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, hyper + glykys, sweet, haima, blood
a greater than normal amount of glucose in the blood. Most frequently associated with diabetes mellitus, the condition may occur in newborns, after the administration of glucocorticoid hormones, and with an excess infusion of IV solutions containing glucose, especially in poorly monitored long-term hyperalimentation. Also spelled hyperglycaemia. Also called hyperglycosemia. Compare hypoglycemia.

hyperglycemia

Metabolism An abnormal ↑ in serum glucose, most commonly due to DM. See Diabetes mellitus, Glucose tolerance test, Hyperglycinemia.

hy·per·gly·ce·mi·a

(hī'pĕr-glī-sē'mē-ă)
An abnormally high concentration of glucose in the blood, a feature of diabetes mellitus.
Synonym(s): hyperglycaemia.
[hyper- + G. glykys, sweet, + haima, blood]

Hyperglycemia

Condition characterized by excessively high levels of glucose in the blood, and occurs when the body does not have enough insulin or cannot use the insulin it does have to turn glucose into energy. Hyperglycemia is often indicative of diabetes that is out of control.

hyperglycemia,

n a disorder characterized by elevated glucose levels in the blood.

hy·per·gly·ce·mi·a

(hī'pĕr-glī-sē'mē-ă)
Abnormally high concentration of glucose in the circulating blood, seen in diabetes mellitus.
Synonym(s): hyperglycaemia.
[hyper- + G. glykys, sweet, + haima, blood]

hyperglycemia (hī´purglīsē´mēə),

n an increase in the concentration of sugar in the blood. It is a feature of diabetes mellitus.

hyperglycemia

excess of glucose in the blood.

posthypoglycemic hyperglycemia
References in periodicals archive ?
Movement disorders related with hyperglycemia may be in the form of chorea and/or ballismus.
In November, the FDA's Endocrinologic and Metabolic Drugs Advisory Committee unanimously supported approval of pasireotide, based on the results of the study, although committee members were concerned about the marked hyperglycemia and abnormal liver enzymes reported in some patients.
14) tested the relationship between diabetes and hepatosteatosis and, hepatosteatosis was found to be independent from fasting plasma glucose levels, but 1-and 2-hour hyperglycemia were closely linked to steatosis.
Unfortunately, there are several limitations of the study, firstly; the sample size is very small, secondly; they have only analyzed the left atrial cells and the response of the right atrium to hyperglycemia is still unknown and thirdly; they have not assessed the possible paradoxical response of AERP to increased heart rate which is another characteristic of electrical remodeling.
Although the causes remain unclear, hyperglycemia is an important, pathophysiological marker in both diabetic and nondiabetic patients requiring intensive care (Falciglia, 2007; Umpierrez, 2007).
The relationship between hyperglycemia and stroke remains controversial.
It should normally be used in combination with a long-acting or basal insulin to cover the fasting and interprandial hyperglycemia.
Some of these cases (the percentage was not reported) exhibited a close relationship between treatment with antipsychotics and the development/resolution of hyperglycemia.
Objective: To investigate the association between hyperglycemia and in-hospital mortality in elderly patients with Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB).
Adverse events reported in >30% of renal, cardiac or liver transplant patients receiving CellCept (in combination with cyclosporine and corticosteroids) were pain, fever, headache, asthenia, anemia, leucopenia (patients should be monitored for neutropenia; dosing should be interrupted or the dose reduced if neutropenia develops), thrombocytopenia, leukocytosis, urinary tract infection, hypertension, hypotension, peripheral edema, hypercholesteremia, hypokalemia, hyperglycemia, creatinine, BUN and cough increased, hypomagnesemia, diarrhea, constipation, nausea, vomiting, respiratory infection, dyspnea, lung disorder, pleural effusion, tremor and insomnia.
In addition to providing a novel mechanism to treat hyperglycemia, AJD101 may contribute to beta-cell rest which could be expected to alter the otherwise progressive deterioration of pancreatic function that characterizes this chronic disease.