hyperemia


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Related to hyperemia: active hyperemia, passive hyperemia, reactive hyperemia

hyperemia

 [hi″per-e´me-ah]
an excess of blood in a part; called also engorgement. adj., adj hypere´mic.
active hyperemia (arterial hyperemia) that due to local or general relaxation of arterioles.
leptomeningeal hyperemia congestion of the pia-arachnoid.
passive hyperemia that due to obstruction of flow of blood from the area.
reactive hyperemia that due to increase in blood flow after its temporary interruption.
venous hyperemia passive hyperemia.

hy·per·e·mi·a

(hī'pĕr-ē'mē-ă),
The presence of an increased amount of bloodflow in a part or organ.
See also: congestion.
[hyper- + G. haima, blood]

hyperemia

/hy·per·emia/ (-e´me-ah) engorgement; an excess of blood in a part.hypere´mic
active hyperemia , arterial hyperemia that due to local or general relaxation of arterioles.
exercise hyperemia  vasodilation of the capillaries in muscles in response to the onset of exercise, proportionate to the force of the muscular contractions.
passive hyperemia  that due to obstruction to flow of blood from the area.
reactive hyperemia  that due to increase in blood flow after its temporary interruption.
venous hyperemia  passive h.

hyperemia

(hī′pə-rē′mē-ə)
n.
An increase in the quantity of blood flow to a body part; engorgement.

hy′per·e′mic (-mĭk) adj.

hyperemia

[hī′pərē′mē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, hyper + haima, blood
an excess of blood in part of the body, caused by increased blood flow, as in the inflammatory response, local relaxation of arterioles, or obstruction of the outflow of blood from an area. Skin overlying a hyperemic area usually becomes reddened and warm. hyperemic, adj.

hyperemia

An excess of blood flow through a particular tissue. Cf Congestion.

hy·per·e·mi·a

(hī'pĕr-ē'mē-ă)
The presence of an increased amount of blood in a part or organ.
See also: congestion
[hyper- + G. haima, blood]

hyperemia

an increased blood flow to an organ or tissue.

hyperemia (hīˈ·p·rēˑ·mē·),

n condition of increased circulatory flow, warmth, and flushed appearance in an area. Massage therapists often create hyperemia to warm and soften tissue in preparation for specific or deeper work.

hy·per·e·mi·a

(hī'pĕr-ē'mē-ă)
Increased amount of bloodflow in a body part or organ.
See also: congestion
[hyper- + G. haima, blood]

hyperemia (hī´pərē´mēə),

n an increased and excessive amount of blood in a tissue. The hyperemia may be active or passive.
hyperemia, active,
n a type caused by an increased flow of blood to an area by active dilation of both the arterioles and capillaries. It is associated with neurogenic, hormonal, and metabolic function.
hyperemia, passive,
n a type caused by a decreased outflow of blood from an area. It may be generalized, resulting from cardiac, renal, or pulmonary disorders, or it may be localized, as in the oral cavity, and caused by pressure from mechanical or physical obstruction or by pressure from a tumor, denture, filling, or salivary calculus.
hyperemia, pulpal
n a condition in which an injury, infection, or irritant causes the blood vessels around the tooth's pulp to dilate, resulting in painful pressure.

hyperemia

an excess of blood in a part.

active hyperemia, arterial hyperemia
that due to local or general relaxation of arterioles.
leptomeningeal hyperemia
congestion of the pia-arachnoid.
passive hyperemia
that due to obstruction to flow of blood from the area.
pulpal hyperemia
hyperemia of the tooth pulp.
reactive hyperemia
that due to increase in blood flow after its temporary interruption.
venous hyperemia
passive hyperemia.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, development has been held back by the side effect profile of ROCK inhibitors, particularly hyperemia.
The other findings include preauricular lympadenopathy, hyperemia, watery discharge, palpebral edema, rhinitis, pharyngitis and other symptoms of upper respiratory infection (48,50).
Postocclusive reactive hyperemia and thermal response in the skin microcirculation of subjects with spinal cord injury.
Amongst 18 % patients of 2nd group during conducting of test for reactive hyperemia it was registered the paradoxical vasoconstrictive reaction, indicating a more expressed endothelial dysfunction.
Also, there was thickening and stiffening of the intestinal walls; hyperemia and edema of mucus membranes; erosions, and the formation of ulcers.
In treatment group with eucerin and zinc oxide on 14th days of experiment, wound space was filled by young cells and vessel rich granulation tissues and hyperemia was observed in new vessels.
assembles 15 chapters written by contributors from the US, Europe, and Asia specializing in functional magnetic resonance, electrophysiology, and optical imaging methods who explain the basic principles of their techniques and how they are used in brain imaging to understand functions such as neural activity, energy metabolism, blood flow, the structures of tissues, and functional hyperemia.
Endoscopic findings vary from diffuse mucosal hyperemia (thickening of gastric folds leading to narrowing of the lumen) to nodular or polypoid lesions.
Postradiation dermatitis can include reactions ranging from mild to moderate dryness and peeling to significant erythema, hyperemia, and moist desquamation with loss of epidermal barrier, said Dr.
The noninvasive test, reactive hyperemia peripheral arterial tonometry (RH-PAT), measures how the volume of a fingertip changes as blood flows through it.
Scientists are testing a new screening tool, called reactive hyperemia peripheral arterial tonometry (RH-PAT), to assess early-stage heart disease.