hyperechoic

hy·per·e·cho·ic

(hī'pĕr-e-kō'ik),
1. In ultrasonography, pertaining to material that produces echoes of higher amplitude or density than the surrounding medium.
2. Denoting a region in an ultrasound image in which the echoes are stronger than normal or than surrounding structures.

hyperechoic

adjective Referring to an abnormal increased in echoes by ultrasonography due to a pathologic change in tissue density.

hyperechoic

Imaging adjective Referring to an abnormal ↑ in echoes by ultrasonography, due to a pathologic change in tissue density. See Ultrasound.

hy·per·ech·o·ic

(hī'pĕr-ĕ-kō'ik)
1. Denoting a region in an ultrasound image in which the echoes are stronger than normal or than surrounding structures.
2. ultrasonography Pertaining to material that produces echoes of higher amplitude or density than the surrounding medium.

hyperechoic

producing an increased amplitude of waves returned in ultrasonography; characteristic of bone and dense tumor tissue.
References in periodicals archive ?
No hyperechoic foci were seen to suggest calcification or haemorrhage.
6) These patterns are thought to represent hyperechoic muscle with interlacing edematous hypoechoic connective tissue that may be analogous to the "checkerboard" pattern seen on gross pathology.
Normal hyperechoic area in the center of the kidney was replaced by large hydronephrotic renal pelvis.
Both the ventromedian and caudal parasternal coupling sites provide good views of the ventriculus (Fig 8), which is marked by a hypoechoic, round to oval muscular layer with an adjacent hyperechoic koilin lining.
Bl) Liver IOUS image in dog with hepatic liemangiosarcoma (dog number 2) showing countless intraparenchymal hyperechoic nodules and (B2) liver fragment of the same region.
Sonography of the local part showed a large mass with peripheral vascularity, heterogeneous hyperechoic areas, thick echoes and non-vascular areas in the centre.
B-scan ultrasonography revealed a hyperechoic choroidal lesion with acoustic shadowing.
Angiolipoma appears as a mass with a central hyperechoic portion surrounded by a hypoechoic part on the periphery on abdominal echo.
In cases with focal myositis, sonographic image has been reported to vary and may be hypoechoic or hyperechoic.
Ultrasound has been shown to reveal an oval structure with a hypoechoic rim and hyperechoic center, spontaneous movement, and peripheral blood flow (6).