hyperechoic

hy·per·e·cho·ic

(hī'pĕr-e-kō'ik),
1. In ultrasonography, pertaining to material that produces echoes of higher amplitude or density than the surrounding medium.
2. Denoting a region in an ultrasound image in which the echoes are stronger than normal or than surrounding structures.

hyperechoic

adjective Referring to an abnormal increased in echoes by ultrasonography due to a pathologic change in tissue density.

hyperechoic

Imaging adjective Referring to an abnormal ↑ in echoes by ultrasonography, due to a pathologic change in tissue density. See Ultrasound.

hy·per·ech·o·ic

(hī'pĕr-ĕ-kō'ik)
1. Denoting a region in an ultrasound image in which the echoes are stronger than normal or than surrounding structures.
2. ultrasonography Pertaining to material that produces echoes of higher amplitude or density than the surrounding medium.

hyperechoic

producing an increased amplitude of waves returned in ultrasonography; characteristic of bone and dense tumor tissue.
References in periodicals archive ?
8) However, it can be iso-oechoic or even hyperechoic.
Differentiated articular cartilage was seen as isoechoic-mildly hyperechoic band like structure bordered with thin, medial condylar cortex.
In ultrasonography, the presence of solid non hyperechoic ovarian mass and ascites together could be suggestive of ovarian malignancy but metastases to the ovary should be considered as a differential diagnosis.
The distal end of the needle is grooved, rendering it hyperechoic and improving ultrasound visualization (Figure 3b).
The well-defined mass appeared as a large, rounded, mixed echogenicity, inhomogeneous hyperechoic foci.
Ultrasound typically shows a well-defined hyperechoic or isoechoic mass with a hypoechoic rim and posterior acoustic shadowing.
Ultrasound examination revealed 2 hyperechoic liver nodules (6 and 3 cm in diameter) in segment V.
gland volume, PSA density, status of the capsule and seminal vesicles, as well as location of hypoechoic and hyperechoic lesions within the prostate.
56) On ultrasound, according to the particular case, LGMP can appear as either a well-defined, nonspecific mass or as simple bladder-wall thickening with variable echogenicity, and the lesion being described as hypoechoic or hyperechoic.
Once inserted subdermally and just under the centre of the probe, the needle tip should be visualised as a hyperechoic dot (Figure 1A).