hyperactivity


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hyperactivity

 [hi″per-ak-tiv´……ĭ-te]
1. abnormally increased muscular activity or function.
2. former name for, and now a principal sign of, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. adj. adj hyperac´tive.

hy·per·ac·tiv·i·ty

(hī'pĕr-ak-tiv'i-tē),
1. Synonym(s): superactivity
2. General restlessness or excessive movement such as that characterizing children with attention deficit disorder or hyperkinesis.

hyperactivity

/hy·per·ac·tiv·i·ty/ (-ak-tiv´ĭ-te)
1. excessive or abnormally increased muscular function or activity.
2. former name for attention-deficit. hyperac´tive

hyperactivity

[-aktiv′itē]
Etymology: Gk, hyper + L, activus, active
any abnormally increased motor activity or function involving either the entire organism or a particular organ, as the heart or thyroid. Compare hypoactivity. See also attention deficit disorder.

hyperactivity

Neurology A state of generalized restlessness and excess movement; hyperactivity in children is common but, if extreme, reaches ADD; idiopathic hyperactivity in adults is often abnormal and may indicate a manic state. See Attention-deficit disorder, Bipolar disorder.

hy·per·ac·tiv·i·ty

(hī'pĕr-ak-tiv'i-tē)
1. Synonym(s): superactivity.
2. General restlessness or excessive movement such as that characterizing children with attention deficit disorder or hyperkinesis.

hyperactivity

An unduly high level of restlessness and aggression with a low level of concentration and a low threshold of frustration, especially as resulting from minimal brain dysfunction. The term is usually applied to children and is sometimes called the ‘hyperkinetic syndrome’.

hyperactivity,

n excessive and often inappropriate activity, often associated with attention-deficit disorder. See also disorder, attention-deficit.

hy·per·ac·tiv·i·ty

(hī'pĕr-ak-tiv'i-tē)
General restlessness or excessive movement such as that characterizing children with attention deficit disorder or hyperkinesis.

hyperactivity,

n the presence of abnormally heightened behaviors.

hyperactivity

the state of being hyperactive. Seen in early stages of many poisonings causing nervous system excitation, early encephalitides, anoxia, water deprivation; also at weaning or temporary separation from young or herd. Also in canine and sow hysteria.

rumenoreticular hyperactivity
a diagnostic sign in vagus indigestion.

Patient discussion about hyperactivity

Q. My son who is 4yrs old is so hyper-active. How do I find out if my son has ADHD or ADD? My son who is 4yrs old is so hyper-active that he climbs on everything and jumps off everything to. I cannot prevent that. I have also punished him. He cries for a split moment and then he just goes back to doing the same thing. I've tried every type of punishment that I could think of. I'm afraid of him. What can I do? How do I find out if my son has ADHD or ADD?

A. I agree complete physical and psycho analysis to rule out any underlying cause. But young children often act out characters; you could ask him why he's doing this and give plenty of proper oportunities to do so. Example when he climbs on and jumps off the furniture ask him what he is doing. He may be pretending to be something or someone. If so ask him where "so and So" does their jumping and ask or remind him what the funiture is for. explain how to properly use it have him demonstrate. Example: " What is a chair for or how do we use a chair? (sitting) "Where" (on the seat, child may touch the seat and answer here) "show me how" (child sits on seat of chair). Praise the positive behavior smiling and then suggest that he can play "so an So" somewhere else at another time: for instance if possible take him out to the playground or in a safe area lie a firm suitcase or other boxlike item on its side, cover with a soft quilt and supervise his c

Q. My 5 year old son is diagnosed with ADHD and he is more hyperactive than attention seeking. My 5 year old son is diagnosed with ADHD and he is more hyperactive than attention seeking. We are planning for alternative treatment now and then we would try for medicine. I've heard about increasing on Omega-3 -fish oil, but is there anything else out there that is safe enough to try?

A. Many are there, which I have tried for my son from 4 years. First and the foremost is the diet which I think you know. Behavioral and Cognitive therapies can be tried as it’s very effective. You can try a chiropractor and as well calming techniques. Try them……they are helpful.

Q. I’m a family man; my five year old daughter used to be more hyperactive. I need help. I’m a family man; my five year old daughter used to be more hyperactive and so I took her to our doctor and he diagnosed her with ADHD. My wife and I like to choose a good medication route for her. But we don’t know which is safe enough to try? I need help.

A. Dear, there are a number of treatments available for ADHD. ADHD is a condition where a child or adult can not stay focused on something, but I am curious to know a lot about the circumstances of your child. I would strongly recommend you to consult a "therapist" or coach specialized in ADHD and child development.

More discussions about hyperactivity
References in periodicals archive ?
So, if you have a child or you know one with hyperactivity problems and these other symptoms, seek an evaluation with a child psychiatrist nearest your location in order to receive expert care and help the child to improve their academic performance and attain their full potential.
Assessment and management of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder in adults.
Participants had a DSM-IV ADHD rating score of greater than 15, with high hyperactivity and inattention.
The report reviews key players involved in the therapeutics development for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and enlists all their major and minor projects
The new research isn't the first time that scientists have dismissed a link between sugar and hyperactivity.
The authors recommend that children should not consume sweetened energy drinks and that more research is needed into the link between such beverages and hyperactivity disorders.
In addition to hyperactivity and inattention, heavily sugared beverages also impact childhood obesity, notes Ickovics, and sugar-sweetened beverages are a leading cause of added calories in the diets of obese children.
The single variance analysis statistics is used to investigate the mean difference of the attention deficit and hyperactivity scores between experimental and control groups.
The dopamine theory of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).
Results showed that children who were exposed to the highest third amount of TRAP during the first year of life were more likely to have hyperactivity scores in the "at risk" range when they were 7 years old.
Sugar is another diet topic that has been linked to hyperactivity and, supposedly, debunked.
For most psychologists, behaviour disorders accompanied by motor hyperactivity and aggressive behavior represent a major concern.