hymenopterans


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Related to hymenopterans: order Orthoptera

hymenopterans

Medical entology Insects of the order Hymenoptera–eg, honeybee, yellow jacket, yellow hornet, white-faced hornet, polistes wasp and ants. See Immunotherapy, Killer bees.
Hymenopteran families
Apidae Honeybees–Apis mellifera–may react to pheromones released by a hivemates and swarm victim
Bombidae Bumblebees are relatively docile and usually have laisez-faire attitude
Formicidae Ants–Solenopsis invicta–en masse, may be fatal
Vespidae Wasps–Chlorion ichneumonidae, hornets–Vespula maculata, yellowjackets–V maculiformis–are less often assocated with allergic reactions than Apidae
References in periodicals archive ?
Some solitary hymenopterans display preferences for nest cavities based on cavity diameter (Torchio and Tepedino, 1980; Fricke, 1991).
The average number of hymenopteran parasitoids individuals collected on each sampling occasion was compared between trap types, sampling sites, and seasons using analysis of variance (ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis test) (Hammer et al.
Hymenopteran parasitoids on fruit-infesting Tephritidae (Diptera) in Latin America and the southern United States: Diversity, distribution, taxonomic status and their use in fruit fly biological control.
The general structure of most silks made by the hymenopteran insects with stingers--the bees, hornets and most wasps--has been known for some time and is very different from other silks.
The latter is relevant to determine habitat structure because many of the hymenopteran species in our study nest in the ground, and soil compactness could thus affect their nesting success.
Thus, of the crop protection products applied in banana, volatile insecticides such as the nematicides and chlorpyrifos treated bags were most likely to have significant direct toxic effects on hymenopteran communities.
Halid Aliev (Institute of Zoology of AS of Azerbaijan) for identifying the hymenopteran insects.
In that study, important foods included beetles (Scarabaeidae, Chrysomelidae--spotted cucumber beetle, Carabidae, and unidentified Coleoptera), hemipterans (a green Pentatomidae--stinkbug, Acrosternon hilare), hymenopterans (Formicidae and Ichneumonidae), homopterans (Cicadellidae), and lepidopterans.
Flies and hymenopterans (bees and wasps) also differ in their flight patterns.
Most larvae of this family are instead parasitic on other insects, particularly Hymenopterans (Borror et al.
Ants collected from pitfall traps during 1997 and 1998 represented 88% (3,733) of all hymenopterans (4,223) captured.