hydroxide

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hydroxide

 [hi-drok´sīd]
the OH anion or a compound containing the OH ion.

hy·drox·ide

(hī-drok'sīd),
1. A compound containing a potentially ionizable hydroxyl group; particularly a compound that liberates OH- upon dissolving in water.
2. The hydroxide anion, OH-.

hydroxide

/hy·drox·ide/ (hi-drok´sīd) any compound containing a hydroxyl group.

hydroxide (OH-)

[hīdrok′sīd]
an ion.

hy·drox·ide

(hī-drok'sīd)
A compound containing a potentially ionizable hydroxyl group; particularly a compound that liberates OH- on dissolving in water.

hy·drox·ide

(hī-drok'sīd)
A compound containing a potentially ionizable hydroxyl group.

hydroxide (hīdrok´sīd´),

n an ionic compound that contains the OH2 ion, usually consisting of metals or the metal equivalent of the ammonium cation (NH42) that inactivates an acid.

hydroxide

the OH anion or a compound containing the OH ion.
References in periodicals archive ?
A higher hydroxide ion level during kraft cooking gave a brighter unbleached pulp and a somewhat higher final brightness in both the OD(EOP)DnD and OD(EOP)DP sequences.
In the June 27 Nature, Tuckerman and his colleagues in Europe report that a hydroxide ion moving through water weakly bonds to four, not three, water molecules.
According to Faraday's law increasing the electrolysis time, the concentration of hydroxide ions to form floc is increased, that leads to increases of ECF process efficiency.
8a is due to the attack of aggressive hydroxide ions, with the specimen undergoing more or less uniform corrosion.
As water molecules break down at the negative electrode to release hydrogen gas, they leave behind hydroxide ions.
The conversion of calcium oxide to calcium hydroxide is followed by the dissolution of calcium hydroxide to yield calcium ions and hydroxide ions on the surface of the particle and finally by the diffusion of calcium and hydroxide ions into the bulk of solution (Fig.
The electrolysis process operates by reducing water to hydrogen gas and hydroxide ions at an electrode surface (cathode), thereby creating a localized environment at the cathode that is highly insoluble to scale-forming mineral deposits.
And/or add sulfur (the correct amount will be listed on your soil test), which reacts with hydroxide ions to produce hydrogen sulfate.
The freed hydroxide ions eat into the matrix, snipping apart the polymer chains.
In a matter of seconds, the conditioning agent hydroxylates the implant surface - dramatically boosting the surface energy through contact with hydroxide ions (OH-) to achieve superhydrophilicity.