hydrolytic enzyme


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Related to hydrolytic enzyme: lysosome

hydrolytic enzyme

An enzyme that catalyzes hydrolysis.
See also: enzyme

hydrolytic enzyme

see HYDROLASE.
References in periodicals archive ?
Effect of garlic-derived ailyl sulphides on morphogenesis and hydrolytic enzyme secretion in Candida albicans.
Recent examples for true treatment failures--that means plausible rationale from pre-clinical investigations, but clear lack of efficacy under clinical conditions in the absence of major side effects--include the CCR1 antagonist BX-471, hydrolytic enzymes, anti-LFA-1 and anti-infective agents.
Among the culture collection strains tested for hydrolytic enzyme activities most of them were negative for the production of the enzymes, only two genera Bacillus and Marinococcus showed the highest variety of production of hydrolytic enzyme activities (Table 1), both of them belong to Gram-positive bacteria.
Effect of Carboxymethyl Chitin-Glucan on the Activity of Some Hydrolytic Enzymes in Maize Plants.
In a similar way, researchers have demonstrated that neutrophils may contribute to tissue injury by the release of leukotrienes, free oxygen radicals and hydrolytic enzymes in ISO induced MI (11, 30).
One approach involves incorporation of hydrolytic enzymes into low-surface energy polydi-methylsiloxane coatings to provide a dual mechanism for reducing attachment of marine organisms.
Effects of sorbitol addition on the action of free and immobilized hydrolytic enzymes in organic media.
Later the same principle was validated for other hydrolytic enzymes, and was also quantified in terms of LFE relationships [25,26].
A double blind, randomized, parallel group study on the efficacy and safety of treating acute lateral ankle sprain with oral hydrolytic enzymes.
Hydrolytic enzymes production in Micrococcus roseus growing on different cellulasic substrate.
Biomarkers of periodontal activity may be obtained from potential proteolytic and hydrolytic enzymes of inflammatory cell origin [2].
It was hypothesized that the electron-dense (type 1) granules were phagocytosed foreign materials (microorganisms, or other granules) or internal waste materials (organelles or fragments); the low electron-dense granules (type 2) primary lysosomes, probably originating in the Golgi complex or endoplasmic reticulum; and the medium electron-dense granules, secondary lysosomes, formed by fusion of type 1 and type 2 granules or matured by type 1 granules, which absorbed some hydrolytic enzymes.