hydrogenase


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Related to hydrogenase: nitrogenase

hydrogenase

 [hi´dro-jen-ās″]
an enzyme that catalyzes the reduction of various substances by combining them with molecular hydrogen.

hy·dro·gen·ase

(hī'drō-jen-ās, hī-droj'ĕ-nās),
1. Any enzyme that removes a hydride ion (or H:-) from NADH (or NADPH). Synonym(s): hydrogenlyase
2. The enzyme that catalyzes the reaction of 2H+ with ferricytochrome or ferredoxin to generate H2.

hydrogenase

(hī-drŏj′ə-nās′, -nāz′)
n.
An enzyme in certain microorganisms that catalyzes the hydrolysis or reduction of a substrate by molecular hydrogen.

hydrogenase

[hī′drōjənās′]
Etymology: Gk, hydor, water, genein, to produce, ase, suffix indicating an enzyme
an enzyme that catalyzes reduction of molecules by combining them with two atoms of hydrogen.

hydrogenase

(1) Hydrogen dehydrogenase, EC 1.12.1.2.
(2) Cytochrome-c3 hydrogenase, EC 1.12.2.1.
(3) EC 1.18.99.1 (transferred to ferredoxin hydrogenase, EC 1.12.7.2).
(4) Any enzyme that removes H+ from NADH or adds H+ to ferricytochrome or ferredoxin.

hy·dro·gen·ase

(hī-droj'ĕn-ās)
Any enzyme that removes a hydride ion (or H:-) from NADH (or NADPH) or adds hydrogen to ferricytochrome or to ferredoxin.

hydrogenase

an ENZYME that can use molecular hydrogen to reduce various substances.

hydrogenase

an enzyme that catalyzes the reduction of various substances by combining them with molecular hydrogen.
References in periodicals archive ?
On the other hand, the power output was 25 times as great as it was when the researchers equipped the fuel cell with a different electrode coated with a bacterial hydrogenase known to have a more typical vulnerability to oxygen.
Using computer modeling, the team created an all-atom simulation model based on the crystal structure of hydrogenase Cpl from Clostridium pasteurianum.
Conversely, Russell and Jeraci (1984) presumably inhibited hydrogenase activity in ruminal fermentative organisms via carbon monoxide introduction with the consequences that headspace [H.
The alternatives include bioethanol, which can be generated by corn, sugar cane, biomass conversion, engineering of the Pichia stiptis genome for fermentation, biomass sources, including cellulose biomass using thermophilic bacteria, mesophilic bacteria, carbohydrate-active enzymes, and synthesis gas; methane from acetate, mixed-culture processing, gas hydrates and biowaste; methanol from biomass and other sources; hydrogen from hydrogenase engineering, purple non-sulfur photosynthetic bacteria ad water-splitting; microbial fuel cells; organic solvents, including butanol fermentation; microbial oil recovery from mature reservoirs; and the exploitation of microbial genomes for energy production.
Thomas Rauchfuss, professor from the University of Illinois, presented a plenary lecture titled, "Iron Carbonyl Comes to Life--inorganic chemistry and the hydrogenase enzymes.
The bioreactor employed a unique type of hydrogenase activity found in some photosynthetic bacteria that functions in darkness to shift CO (and [H.
marinus viability and proliferation by measuring mitochondrial hydrogenase activity in viable cells (Dungan & Hamilton 1995, La Peyre 1996, Volety & Fisher 2000, Elandalloussi et al.
Another enzyme, a hydrogenase isolated from bacteria found in a deep-sea hydrothermal vent, then releases the hydrogen from NADPH, generating hydrogen gas and enabling NADP to repeat the cycle.
During fermentation, hydrogen is released though the action of an enzyme called hydrogenase, powered by electrons generated by either the breakdown of organic compounds or the splitting of water by photosynthesis.
Of these, NADH hydrogenase, ketohexokinase, ATP synthase F0, and electron-transfer flavoprotein-ubiquinone oxidoreductase are related to the mitochondrial respiratory chain.
Now, according to a report in New Scientist, Reisner and colleague Fraser Armstrong have shown that a newly discovered bacterial hydrogenase is much more resistant to both gases.
For hydrogen production, plants use large proteins appropriately called hydrogenases as their catalysts, with a pair of iron atoms doing the job of electron shuffling and branches of proteins to co-ordinate the action.

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