hydrogen bond


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Related to hydrogen bond: ionic bond, Van der Waals bond

bond

 [bond]
the linkage between atoms or radicals of a chemical compound, or the symbol representing this linkage and indicating the number and attachment of the valencies of an atom in constitutional formulas, represented by a pair of dots or a line between atoms, e.g., H—O—H, H—C≡C—H or H:O:H, H:C:::C:H.
coordinate covalent bond a covalent bond in which one of the bonded atoms furnishes both of the shared electrons.
covalent bond a chemical bond between two atoms or radicals formed by the sharing of a pair (single bond), two pairs (double bond), or three pairs of electrons (triple bond).
disulfide bond a strong covalent bond, —S—S—, important in linking polypeptide chains in proteins, the linkage arising as a result of the oxidation of the sulfhydryl (SH) groups of two molecules of cysteine.
high-energy phosphate bond an energy-rich phosphate linkage present in adenosine triphosphate (ATP), phosphocreatine, and certain other biological molecules. On hydrolysis at pH 7 it yields about 8000 calories per mole, in contrast to the 3000 calories yielded by phosphate esters. The bond stores energy that is used to drive biochemical processes, such as the synthesis of macromolecules, contraction of muscles, and the production of the electrical potentials for nerve conduction.
high-energy sulfur bond an energy-rich sulfur linkage, the most important of which occurs in the acetyl-CoA molecule, the main source of energy in fatty acid biosynthesis.
hydrogen bond a weak, primarily electrostatic, bond between a hydrogen atom bound to a highly electronegative element (such as oxygen or nitrogen) in a given molecule, or part of a molecule, and a second highly electronegative atom in another molecule or in a different part of the same molecule.
ionic bond a chemical bond in which electrons are transferred from one atom to another so that one bears a positive and the other a negative charge, the attraction between these opposite charges forming the bond.
peptide bond the —CO—NH— linkage formed between the carboxyl group of one amino acid and the amino group of another; it is an amide linkage joining amino acids to form peptides.

hy·dro·gen bond

a bond arising from the sharing of a hydrogen atom, covalently bound to a strongly electronegative element (for example, N, O, or a halogen), with another strongly electronegative element (for example, N, O, or a halogen). In substances of biologic importance, the most common hydrogen bonds are those in which H links N to O or N; such bonds link purines on one strand to pyrimidines on the other strand of nucleic acids, thus maintaining double-stranded structures as in the Watson-Crick helix.

hy·dro·gen bond

(hī'drō-jen bond)
A bond arising from the sharing of a hydrogen atom, covalently bound to an electronegative element (e.g., N or O), with another electronegative element (e.g., N, O, or a halogen).

hydrogen bond

A bond in which a hydrogen atom is shared by two other atoms. The hydrogen is more firmly attached to one of these (which is called the hydrogen donor) than to the other (which is called the hydrogen acceptor). The acceptor has a relative negative charge, and, as unlike charges attract each other, a bond is formed to the hydrogen atom. Hydrogen bonds are weak and easily broken but occur extensively in biomolecules. The link between the bases in the two chains of DNA are hydrogen bonds. Adenine links to thymine by two hydrogen bonds, and guanine links to cytosine by three hydrogen bonds.

hydrogen bond

the attractive force between the hydrogen atom of one molecule and another molecule forming a noncovalent bond. These weak bonds are relevant to the biological function of particular compounds, being formed in the secondary structure of proteins and between complementary base pairs in NUCLEIC ACIDS.

hydrogen bond,

n a weak electrostatic bond between two atoms with opposite charges.

bond

the linkage between atoms or radicals of a chemical compound, or the symbol representing this linkage and indicating the number and attachment of the valencies of an atom in constitutional formulas, e.g. H−O−H, H−C= C−H and can be represented by a pair of dots between atoms, e.g. H:O:H, H:C:::C:H.

coordinate covalent bond
a covalent bond in which one of the bonded atoms furnishes both of the shared electrons.
covalent bond
a chemical bond between two atoms or radicals formed by the sharing of a pair (single bond), two pairs (double bond) or three pairs of electrons (triple bond).
disulfide bond
a strong covalent bond, −S−S−, important in linking polypeptide chains in proteins, the linkage arising as a result of the oxidation of the sulfhydryl (SH) groups of two molecules of cysteine.
high-energy phosphate bond
an energy-rich phosphate linkage present in adenosine triphosphate (ATP), phosphocreatine and certain other biological molecules. On hydrolysis at pH 7 it yields about 8000 calories per mole, in contrast to the 3000 calories yielded by phosphate esters. The bond stores energy that is used to drive biochemical processes, such as the synthesis of macromolecules, contraction of muscles, and the production of the electrical potentials for nerve conduction.
high-energy sulfur bond
an energy-rich sulfur linkage, the most important of which occurs in the acetyl-CoA molecule, the main source of energy in fatty acid biosynthesis.
human-animal bond
the psychological interdependence between humans and companion animals.
hydrogen bond
a weak, primarily electrostatic, bond between a hydrogen atom bound to a highly electronegative element (such as oxygen or nitrogen) in a given molecule, or part of a molecule, and a second highly electronegative atom in another molecule or in a different part of the same molecule.
ionic bond
a chemical bond in which electrons are transferred from one atom to another so that one bears a positive and the other a negative charge, the attraction between these opposite charges forming the bond.
peptide bond
the −CO−NH− linkage formed between the carboxyl group of one amino acid and the amino group of another; it is an amide linkage joining amino acids to form peptides.
phosphoanhydride bond
a high energy bond present in ATP.
phosphodiester bond
links between nucleotides in nucleic acids.
References in periodicals archive ?
In principle these donor and acceptor atoms enable to form a significant number of different hydrogen bond pattern (HBP).
The fundamental oscillator involved is best represented by the dimer subunit and its associated hydrogen bond within liquid water itself.
The XRD measurement demonstrates that the microphase-separated aggregates of MAn-g-IIR are significantly enhanced after the introduction of hydrogen bond crosslinking.
Prior to the crystal structure determination, molecular modeling indicated that the [beta]Thr67 side chain hydroxyl group in the distal beta-heme pocket forms a hydrogen bond with the backbone carbonyl of [beta]His63 and is within hydrogen-bonding distance of the ND atom of [beta]His63.
Hydrogen Bonds of Protein-Bound Water Molecules in Rhodopsins (Hideki Kandori).
This is because that MAAM, a Lewis base unit, could form hydrogen bond with Lewis acid of MAA unit and the formed hydrogen bond has much higher bond energy than that formed between MAAM and MMA or MAA and MMA.
That's because each water molecule has the potential to form four hydrogen bonds.
Once in close proximity, the hydrogen bonds work together and become extremely strong.
As water concentration increases, more water molecules enter the interchain free space to hydrogen bond to the ABPBI chains, resulting in decreased d-spacing.
According to literatures (15), (24), (25), the DSC endotherm near 80[degrees]C ascribes to the dissociation of hydrogen bond between hard segments and soft segments (Scheme 2, Type 2).
The range of Calculator Plugins, currently including logP, logD, pKa, Hydrogen Bond Donor/Acceptor and many others is extended with the addition of Conformer calculation, including lowest energy conformer prediction, Stereoisomer, Orbital Electronegativity, Molecular Dynamics, Geometry and 3D Molecular Surface Area calculations.
In a series of the previous studies, we have investigated on the possibility of melt processing of polypropylene (PP)/chlorinated polypropylene (CPP)/PANI composites, and have shown the relationship between the concentration of CPP and the electric property of PP/ CPP/PANI composites, and the influence of CPP on the formation of the intermolecular and intramolecular hydrogen bond in the PP/CPP/PANI composites which has been carefully proved by Fourier-transform infrared spectra (FTIR).