hydrocolloid dressing


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dressing

 [dres´ing]
1. any of various materials used for covering and protecting a wound.
2. in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as choosing, putting on, and removing clothes for a person who cannot do this for himself or herself.
biologic dressing one used in treatment of a burn or other large denuded area of skin to prevent infection and fluid loss; it may consist of synthetic material or a xenograft, allograft, or autograft
hydrocolloid dressing wafers or granules containing particles that interact with wound exudate to absorb the exudate by forming a gel.
pressure dressing one by which pressure is exerted on the covered area to prevent collection of fluids in underlying tissues; most commonly used after skin grafting and in treatment of burns.
protective dressing a light dressing to prevent exposure to injury or infection.

hydrocolloid dressing

Wound care An occlusive and adhesive wafer dressing for moderate amounts of exudate

hydrocolloid dressing

A flexible dressing made of an adhesive, gumlike (hydrocolloid) material such as karaya or pectin covered with a water-resistant film. The dressing keeps the wound surface moist, but, because it excludes air, it may promote anaerobic bacterial growth. It should not be used on wounds that are, or are suspected to be, infected. The directions that come with the dressing should be followed.
See: Dressings: Hydrocolloid
See also: dressing
References in periodicals archive ?
On the other hand, if hydrocolloid dressings are ordered for the same 10 wounds, only 20 to 30 dressing changes a week will be needed.
Summary of clinical studies comparing costs of hydrocolloid dressings to gauze.
Endogenous growth factor may regulate epidermal hyperplasia in chronic venous wounds: Modulation by hydrocolloid dressings.
An investigation of hydrocolloids: A comparative prospective randomised trial of the performance of three hydrocolloid dressings.
Evaluation of hydrocolloid dressings on healing of pressure ulcers in spinal cord injury patients.
In the early 1980s, the first hydrocolloid dressings (Duoderm) were introduced after numerous clinical studies had shown that the gel-type, polymer dressings not only healed experimental superficial wounds faster than gauze, but also facilitated healing of most (previously) recalcitrant pressure and leg ulcers.
The market place has responded with over 100 occlusive dressings, including the polyurethane and hydrocolloid dressings, as well as water-based hydrogel dressings, polymer foams, pastes and gels used to fill in wound cavities, and combinations of the above.
In vivo studies of the Duoderm family of hydrocolloid dressings demonstrate that the dressings serve as a barrier against Pseudomonas, Staph aureus, HIV, and Hepatitis-B.
A statistically significant difference in pain levels, for example, was documented in bum patients treated with hydrocolloid dressings versus traditional silversulfadiazine gauze dressings.
Table 59: World 10-Year Perspective for Advanced Wound Care Products by Product Segment - Percentage Breakdown of Dollar Sales for Moist Wound Healing Products (Alginate Dressings, Film Dressings, Foam Dressings, Hydrocolloid Dressings, and Hydrogel Dressings); Active Wound Healing Products (Skin Replacements, Collagen Dressings, and Growth Factors); Debriding Products; Cleansers; and Sealants Markets for Years 2003, 2008, and 2012 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) II-152
Hydrocolloid Dressings -- Hydrocolloid dressings are self-adhesive, rubber-based products used for low to moderately exuding wounds.