hydrazine


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Related to hydrazine: Methyl hydrazine

hydrazine

 [hi´drah-zēn]
a gaseous diamine, H4N2, or any of its substitution derivatives.

hy·dra·zine

(hī'dră-zēn),
H2N-NH2, an oily liquid from which phenylhydrazine and similar products are derived. It is very toxic and possibly a carcinogen.

hydrazine

/hy·dra·zine/ (hi´drah-zēn) a toxic, irritant, carcinogenic, gaseous diamine, H2N·NH2, or any of its substitution derivatives.

hydrazine

a gaseous diamine, H4N2, or any of its substitution derivatives.

hydrazine sulfate
an inhibitor of gluconeogenesis; used as an appetite stimulant.
References in periodicals archive ?
GPIM is the key mission to demonstrate a green monopropellant alternative to hydrazine," said Jim Oschmann, vice president and general manager of Civil Space and Technology at Ball Aerospace.
The study about the impacts of hydrazine on living organisms has become important in the country with the space activities development in engineering and technology [10-12].
Investigation of the optimum concentration of phenyl hydrazine for the spectrophotometric analysis of glucose Estimation of glucose was carried out as oxidized glucosazone which is a colored compound.
Hydrazine is highly toxic and can induce negative side effects when inhaled or through skin contact.
1], which unambiguously proves the bidentate bridging nature of the hydrazine ligand [17].
For anyone wondering what it actually is, it's likely a 39-litre hydrazine bladder tank (based on its apparent size; there are also much larger hydrazine tanks).
Most of the hydrazine has been moved over to the Moni plant," Patsalis said adding that miniscule amounts remained in one of the out-of-bound units but this posed no health danger.
The recent reports on severe hydrazine poisoning indicate that swallowing about 20-50 ml of hydrazine can prove to be fatal.
Hydrazine sulfate trials involving cancer patients were performed in Russia (then the Soviet Union) and by researchers at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center during the 1970s and 1980s.
The objective was to rupture the fuel tank to dissipate the approximately 1000lbs of hydrazine, a hazardous fuel which could pose a danger to people on earth, before it entered the atmosphere.
Trackers had detected a fireball and vapour cloud which, although not conclusive, both suggested the toxic hydrazine in the fuel tank had been destroyed.