hydergine

Hydergine

 [hi´der-jēn]
trademark for preparations of ergoloid mesylates, ergot alkaloids used to combat mild to moderate dementia in the elderly.

Hydergine

a trademark for a fixed-combination drug containing various ergoloid mesylates.

ergoloid mesylate

Alternative pharmacology
Any of a family of agents used in mainstream medicine to treat migraines. Some alternative medical doctors believe the ergoloid mesylates may be used to reverse age-associated mental impairment related to free radical damage, deposition of lipofuscin and reduced flow of oxygen caused by vasospasm, and have recommended their use for certain “off-label” applications, such as improving memory, treating depression, decreased motor skills and other forms of age-associated mental impairment.

hydergine

Neurology A therapeutic cocktail used to alleviate some Sx of Alzheimer's disease, consisting of ergoloid mesylate–a 'metabolic enhancer,' hydergine's efficacy has not been well established. See Alzheimer's disease, Tacrine.

hydergine (hīˑ·der·jēn),

n a chemical derived from ergot mold that grows on the rye grain, said to have antiaging and cognitive enhancement effects.
References in periodicals archive ?
He was also prescribed Hydergine (which helped reduce symptoms briefly) at one point.
The patient had been treated with different psychotropic medications including antidepressants, antipsychotics, benzodiazepines, propranolol, fentazine and hydergine.
One study compared HM with Piracetam + hydergine and one study compared HM with Piracetam + vitamin E + respiratory stimulant Duxil (almitrine).
Use of hydergine in the treatment of leprosy ulcers.
Hydergine had no effects in Alzheimer's patients at 3 mg/day and did not meet benefit standards at 6 mg/day.
One of the first smart drugs available in this country was hydergine, an extract of rye grain--more specifically a mold that grows on rye grain.
Hydergine, DMAE, and Piracetam are just three of the available medicines that may significantly improve your IQ and memory.
We use Prozac, Piracetam, Hydergine, and Deprenyl to modify our psychology, enhance our concentration, and slow brain aging.
Thompson, et al (N Engl J Med 1990; 323:445-8) found that Hydergine, the only drug currently FDA-approved for Alzheimer's, had no significant benefit in dementia, and may actually worsen dementia in a sub-set of patients.
Ads may be correct when they say that these drugs enhance mental function four times better than the ineffective drug Hydergine.