hunchback

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hunchback

 [hunch´bak]
old term for kyphosis, now considered offensive.

hunch·back

(hŭnch'bak),
Nonmedical term for kyphosis or gibbus.

hunchback

/hunch·back/ (hunch´bak) old term for kyphosis, now considered offensive.

hunchback

(hŭnch′băk′)
n.
1. An individual whose back is hunched due to abnormal convex curvature of the upper spine. Also called humpback.
2. An abnormally curved or hunched back.
3. Kyphosis.

hunch′backed′ adj.

hunchback

A maternal effect gene which is important for patterning of anterior parts (head and thorax) of the Drosophila embryos

hunchback

Orthopedics A trivial name for angular kyphosis–AK which, in children, is either congenital, due to a lack of segmentation or lack of formation of one or more vertebral bodies Treatment Surgical fusion of vertebrae; acquired AK in children is idiopathic and often accompanied by a compensatory ↑ in lumbar lordosis; in adults, AK may be due to infections–eg, midthoracic TB or neoplastic–eg, myeloma or infiltration by an osteophilic CA–eg, breast or kidney

hunchback

a rounded deformity, or hump, of the back, or an animal with such a deformity. The condition is called also kyphosis and is the result of an abnormal upward curvature of the spine.
References in classic literature ?
When I examined the body I found it was quite dead, and the corpse was that of a hunchback Mussulman.
Yesterday, at dusk, I was working in my shop with a light heart when the little hunchback, who was more than half drunk, came and sat in the doorway.
The chief of police and the crowd of spectators were lost in astonishment at the strange events to which the death of the hunchback had given rise.
Sire," replied they, "the hunchback having drunk more than was good for him, escaped from the palace and was seen wandering about the town, where this morning he was found dead.
Accordingly, the chief of police at once set out for the palace, taking with him the tailor, the doctor, the purveyor, and the merchant, who bore the dead hunchback on their shoulders.
HUNCHBACKS, dwarves and even "irrational objections" from the elderly helped delay the introduction of compulsory seatbelts by more than 10 years, secret documents revealed.
With the folklike dance of her Hunchbacks, 1994, McBride introduces into the model of modernism she has thus quoted a narrative explicitly excluded from it.
But the upside of Quasimodo's drawn deformities in Disney's ``The Hunchback of Notre Dame'' is the focus is more on character than the credibility of his afflictions.