host


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host

 [hōst]
1. an animal or plant that harbors and provides sustenance for another organism (the parasite).
2. the recipient of an organ or other tissue derived from another organism (the donor).
accidental host one that accidentally harbors an organism that is not ordinarily parasitic in the particular species.
definitive host (final host) a host in which a parasite attains sexual maturity.
intermediate host a host in which a parasite passes one or more of its asexual stages; usually designated first and second, if there is more than one.
paratenic host a potential or substitute intermediate host that serves until the appropriate definitive host is reached, and in which no development of the parasite occurs; it may or may not be necessary to the completion of the parasite's life cycle.
host of predilection the host preferred by a parasite.
primary host definitive host.
reservoir host an animal (or species) that is infected by a parasite, and which serves as a source of infection for humans or another species.
secondary host intermediate host.
transfer host one that is used until the appropriate definitive host is reached, but is not necessary to completion of the life cycle of the parasite.

host

(hōst),
The organism in or on which a parasite lives, deriving its body substance or energy from the host.
[L. hospes, a host]

host

(hōst)
1. an organism that harbors or nourishes another organism (the parasite).
2. the recipient of an organ or other tissue derived from another organism (the donor).

accidental host  one that accidentally harbors an organism that is not ordinarily parasitic in the particular species.
definitive host , final host the organism in which a parasite passes its adult and sexual existence.
intermediate host  the organism in which a parasite passes its larval or nonsexual existence.
paratenic host  an animal acting as a substitute intermediate host of a parasite, usually having acquired the parasite by ingestion of the original host.
primary host  definitive h.
reservoir host  reservoir (3).

host

(hōst)
n.
1. Biology
a. An organism on which or in which another organism lives.
b. A cell that has been infected by a virus or other infective agent.
2. Medicine The recipient of a transplanted tissue or organ.

host′ly adj.

host

[hōst]
Etymology: L, hospes
1 an organism in which another, usually parasitic, organism is nourished and harbored. A definitive host is one in which the adult parasite lives and reproduces. An intermediate host is one in which the parasite exists in its nonsexual, larval stage. A reservoir host is a primary animal host for organisms that are sometimes parasitic in humans and through which humans may become infected.
2 the recipient of a transplanted organ or tissue. Compare donor.

host

Epidemiology Any organism that can be infected by a pathogen under natural conditions. See Definitive host, Intermediate host, Paratenic host, Transport host Immunology Graft recipient. See Graft, Transplant Informatics A networked computer that performs centralized functions–eg, providing access program or data files to computers in a network; a host may be self-contained or located on Internet; computer that acts as a source of information or capabilities for multiple terminals, peripherals and/or users. See Node, Network. Cf Server.

host

(hōst)
The organism in or on which a parasite lives, thus deriving its body substance or energy.
[L. hospes, a host]

host

1. An organism that provides a residence and nourishment for a parasite.
2. A person receiving a graft of a donated organ or tissue.

host

  1. the organism on which a PARASITE lives.
  2. the recipient of a tissue transplant.
  3. the recipient of recombinant VECTOR molecules (in GENETIC ENGINEERING) or other genetic elements, which can maintain and propagate them.

Host

The organism that harbors or nourishes another organism (parasite). In bartonellosis, the person infected with Bartonella basilliformis.

host

1. an animal or plant that harbors and provides sustenance for another organism (the parasite). Includes paratenic, intermediate etc.
2. the recipient of an organ or other tissue derived from another organism (the donor).

accidental host
one that accidentally harbors an organism that is not ordinarily parasitic in the particular species.
alternate host
intermediate host.
dead-end host
the disease cannot be transmitted from the infected host to another animal.
host determinants
characteristics in the host which determine its susceptibility to a disease, e.g. closeness to parturition and metabolic diseases.
host-parasite reaction
the inflammatory reaction that sometimes occurs around a parasite in tissues, e.g. a warble fly larva in the esophageal wall.
predilection host
the host preferred by a parasite.
primary host
definitive host.
reservoir host
an animal (or species) that is infected by a parasite, and which serves as a source of infection for humans or another species.
host risk factors
epidemiological factors contributing to the development of a disease and which are contributed by the host.
secondary host
intermediate host.
host specificity
the characteristic of a parasite that renders it capable of infecting only one or more specific hosts.
transfer host, transport host
one that is used until the appropriate definitive host is reached, but is not necessary to complete the life cycle of the parasite.
host variable
see host determinants (above).

Patient discussion about host

Q. I was diagnosed with depression and have taken a whole host of antidepressants. I’m Mark, 29 years old male. I was diagnosed with depression and have taken a whole host of antidepressants. My eyes are extremely blurry, I’m worrying about that. Does this side effect go away with time, or is it permanent while on medications?

A. Mark, you really need to consult your doctor. I hope you're not relying totally on the Internet for medical advice. Side effects are common with most drugs, and some are more tolerable than others. "Extremely blurry" eyes seems like it could affect your driving, as cbellh47 wrote, but many other things as well.

Sometimes it does take many, many attempts to discover an anti-depressant or a combination of more than one to achieve a better mood balance. We're all chemically different and react to drugs differently. There's many options and I had to endure years of experimentation before I was satisfied, but I now have the rest of my life to appreciate what I went through.

I also used the help of different doctors and psychiatrists, as well as self-learning. If your doctor doesn't seem to be beneficial, consider asking him/her to recommend a specialist. New treatments come to light regularly and not all docotrs are wise to them.

Just yesterday (01.20.09) a new, control

More discussions about host
References in classic literature ?
And now thir mightiest quelld, the battel swerv'd, With many an inrode gor'd; deformed rout Enter'd, and foul disorder; all the ground With shiverd armour strow'n, and on a heap Chariot and Charioter lay overturnd And fierie foaming Steeds; what stood, recoyld Orewearied, through the faint Satanic Host Defensive scarse, or with pale fear surpris'd, Then first with fear surpris'd and sense of paine Fled ignominious, to such evil brought By sinne of disobedience, till that hour Not liable to fear or flight or paine.
By my leathern coat and tools, which I shall presently have out of that sly host, I swear that I never yet met a man I liked as well as you
Nowhere had I seen my host, nor did I know where he kept himself by night.
exclaimed he, turning round as the noise of the door announced the entrance of the host, who came in to inquire if he was unhurt.
It was perfectly clear that the Signor Sinbad, Franz's host, had the honor of being on excellent terms with the smugglers and bandits along the whole coast of the Mediterranean, and so enjoyed exceptional privileges.
The host remained standing in front of him, looking with a kind of involuntary admiration at his handsome face, combining both gravity and sweetness of expression.
It will be a sorry tale hereafter that an Achaean host, at once so great and valiant, battled in vain against men fewer in number than themselves; but as yet the end is not in sight.
Monsieur," D'Artagnan hastened to say, "the host is bringing me up a pretty piece of roasted poultry and a superb tourteau.
Bide thou here," quoth Robin to the Tinker, "while I go and see that mine host draweth ale from the right butt, for he hath good October, I know, and that brewed by Withold of Tamworth.
Da Souza's arm unchidden sought once more the back of his neighbour's chair, Miss Montressor's eyes did their utmost to win a tender glance from their lavish host.
Their hosts were surprised, explained where and why they had missed their way, said who the tipsy people they had met were, and told them how they ought to go.
In America, and (as I hear) on the continent of Europe also, when your host invites you to dine at a given hour, you pay him the compliment of arriving punctually at his house.