homonym

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homonym

(hŏm′ə-nĭm′, hō′mə-)
n.
1. One of two or more words that have the same sound and often the same spelling but differ in meaning, such as bank (embankment) and bank (place where money is kept).
2.
a. A word used to designate several different things.
b. A namesake.
3. Biology A taxonomic name identical to one previously applied to a different species or other taxon and therefore unacceptable in its new use.

hom′o·nym′ic adj.

homonym

a specific or generic name that has been used for two or more different organisms. The homonym published first is designated as ‘senior’, and ‘junior’ if published last.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to RRS, or restrictive range synonymy, we have human applying synonymously to each separate group, but the view threatens to lead to homonymy if the predicate is applied to the whole class.
of homonymy, they will reject the existence of any sense relation
To borrow terminology from lexical semantics, this phenomenon, customarily referred to as homonymy, (10) covers cases, where (etymologically) unrelated lexical units, or, properly speaking, lexical senses of the units, are singly assigned to individual lexemes which happen to be indistinguishable on formal plain in terms of spelling and sound.
Since Shields takes `homonymy' (and its Greek cognate) to designate the same thing as `being said in many ways', his study is, at the same time, the first grand-scale attempt to offer a systematic account of homonymy in Aristotle.
4) The homonymy (or homography) is lost in translation, since retirarse splits into "to retire" and "to withdraw," and campo is rendered in English as either "camp" or "country.
6-8 reports that `in proper names homonymy is a problem; the ambiguity [GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] arising from it is not resolved without addition of an epithet to the proper names'.
1990) indicate some limitations of LSA in representing the phenomena of homonymy and polysemy, and the disambiguation of each of its meanings depending on the context.
The most likely factor proposed for such a drastic change has to do with a process of homonymy in those cases where op was followed by paet.
24) Furthermore, this homonymy principle applies to the whole organism (25) as well.
We may look upon these examples as homonymy across two or more different languages.
inasmuch as the same information is read twice or thrice; in addition, there are plenty of cases of homonymy or polysemy (e.
Keywords: Araneae, Opiliones, homonymy, replacement names, Bolivia, Brazil, New Hebrides