homologous


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homologous

 [ho-mol´ŏ-gus]
1. corresponding in structure, position, origin, or other aspects.
3. pertaining to an antibody and the antigen that elicited its production.

ho·mol·o·gous

(hō-mol'ō-gŭs), Corresponding or alike in certain critical attributes.
1. In biology or zoology, denoting organs or parts corresponding in evolutionary origin and similar to some extent in structure, but not necessarily similar in function.
2. In chemistry, denoting a single chemical series, differing by fixed increments.
3. In genetics, denoting chromosomes or chromosome parts identical with respect to their construction and genetic content.
4. In immunology, denoting serum or tissue derived from members of a single species, or an antibody with respect to the antigen that produced it.
5. Proteins having identical or similar functions (particularly with respect to proteins from different species).
[see homologue]

homologous

/ho·mol·o·gous/ (ho-mol´ah-gus)
1. corresponding in structure, position, origin, etc.

homologous

(hə-mŏl′ə-gəs, hō-)
adj.
1. Corresponding or similar in position, value, structure, or function.
2. Derived from the same species: a homologous graft.
3. Biology Similar in structure and evolutionary origin, though not necessarily in function, as the flippers of a seal and the hands of a human.
4. Immunology Relating to the correspondence between an antigen and the antibody produced in response to it.
5. Genetics
a. Relating to chromosomes that have the same morphology and linear sequence of gene loci.
b. Relating to genes that are derived from a common ancestor.
6. Chemistry Belonging to or being a series of organic compounds, each successive member of which differs from the preceding member by a constant increment, especially by an added CH2 group.

homologous

[hōmol′əgəs]
Etymology: Gk, homos, same, logos, relation
pertaining to corresponding attributes or similar in structure. Compare analogous. See also homolog.

ho·mol·o·gous

(hŏ-mol'ŏ-gŭs)
1. biology Denoting organs or parts corresponding in evolutionary origin and similar to some extent in structure, but not necessarily similar in function.
2. chemistry Denoting a single chemical series, differing by fixed increments.
3. genetics Denoting chromosomes or chromosome parts identical with respect to their construction and genetic content.
4. immunology Denoting serum or tissue derived from members of a single species, or an antibody with respect to the antigen that produced it.

homologous

1. Of corresponding structure, position, function or value.
2. Having the same consecutive sequence of genes as another chromosome.
3. Belonging to a series of organic compounds of which the successive members differ by constant chemical increments.
4. Of transplantation in which the donor and recipients are of the same species.

homologous

(of organs, or structures) deriving from the same evolutionary origins. For example, the forelimb of a quadruped, the human arm, the wing of a bird, are said to be homologous (see PENTADACTYL LIMB). Usually similarities are seen best in embryonic development, and are regarded by taxonomists as indications of relationships between present-day organisms.

homologous

1. corresponding in structure, position, origin, etc.
2. derived from an animal of the same species but of different genotype; allogeneic.
References in periodicals archive ?
Efficiency of Sall1 knockout by using TALEN-mediated homologous recombination is presented in Table 1.
The high percentage identities of the homologous 18S regions of rDNA make these good sequences to use to identify specimens of Pilobolus to genus.
The homologous cDNA probe for the mRNA encoding ACC was hybridized to the array of control peanut's GDH-synthesized RNA (Fig 3a).
the sporophyte) and is conventionally characterized as a conflict between theories of antithetic and homologous alternation of generations.
The need for homologous blood transfusion diminished considerably.
Genes from two different species are considered homologous if they are related in sequence due to common descent from an ancestral gene present in a shared ancestor.
The last two chapters explore the ways in which the homologous connection between idolatry and commodity fetishism, as violations of teleology, continued to have currency long after explicit discourse on the issue waned.
Homologous carcinomas of the breasts, skin, and salivary glands.
Autotransfusion reduces complications associated with homologous transfusions, such as disease transmission (AIDS, hepatitis), transfusion reactions, and alloimmunization.
3] ceramics has demonstrated that what actually forms is not a solid solution but rather a homologous series of distinct compounds which feature intergrowths of [LiNbO.
Employing a simple enzyme/acid extraction procedure, Streptex provides a homologous antigen of strep groups A, B, C, D, F, and G, which then is identified using group-specific, antibody-coated latex particles.
In addition, homologous sperm added to isolated follicle cells of Phallusia mammillata [8] and Ascidia ceratodes cause glycosidase release (K.