homocentric


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ho·mo·cen·tric

(hō'mō-sen'trik),
Having the same center; denoting rays that meet at a common focus. Compare: heterocentric (1).

homocentric

(hō″mō-sĕn′trĭk) [″ + kentron, center]
Having the same center.
References in periodicals archive ?
The subject knight wants to be the model knight and the male wants to be the other male and thus desire becomes homocentric.
Kellmer's homocentric attitude toward nature is at the root of the difficulties we are having preserving the life of Earth.
Both concepts are homocentric because each envisions perpetual occupation of the planet by one species over all others; the primary objective is perpetuating and improving the lot of humans and not the optimization of the integrity and health of the planet's ecologic life support system and natural capital.
By contrast, the Semitic religions have a homocentric value-orientation, which facilitated the exploitation of nature by humanity for its own welfare.
Chapter 7 examines, rather, the relation between the traveler's vision of nine concentric circles wheeling around a fixed point in Canto 28 and the homocentric Aristotelian universe.
It believes the whole Earth is in a period of transition from the homocentric industrial culture based on self-interest, survival of the fittest, and materialism, to an ecocentric Gaiain culture based on belonging, cooperation, community and mutual respect.
Descartes' intention to "furnish scientific therapy against a foolishly homocentric appeal to purposive notions" (James Collins, Descartes' Philosophy of Nature [Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1971], 90), thus, is quite effectively contrasted with thinkers who did not engage in such misappeals, who not only distinguished and ordered methodologies differently but also found a defense of philosophical analyses of nature in many of the same Scholastic sources that Descartes had utilized.
Some, such as Robert Bellarmine, held for a fluid-heaven through which planets move "like fish in the sea"; others, such as Benedict Pereira, continued to defend Aristotle's universe of homocentric spheres; yet others, such as Christopher Grienberger, inclined at first toward Copernicus's heliocentrism.
Heavenly stuff; the constitution of the celestial objects and the theory of homocentric spheres in Aristotle's cosmology.
1511 Giovanni Battista Amico born; wrote descriptions of models for planetary motions employing only homocentric spheres.