homeotherm


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homeotherm

 [ho´me-o-therm″]
1. an animal that exhibits homeothermy, a warm-blooded animal.

ho·me·o·therm

(hō'mē-ō-therm),
Any animals, including mammals and birds, that tend to maintain a constant body temperature.
[homeo- + G. thermos, warm]

homeotherm

(hō′mē-ə-thûrm′) also

homoiotherm

(hō-moi′ə-)
n.
An organism, such as a mammal or bird, having a body temperature that is constant and largely independent of the temperature of its surroundings.

ho′me·o·ther′mi·a (-thûr′mē-ə), ho′me·o·ther′my (-thûr′mē) n.
ho′me·o·ther′mic (-mĭk) adj.

homeotherm

see HOMOIOTHERM.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some animals, such as hibernating mammals, combine both systems: they are homeotherms in the spring and summer, but with the arrival of winter, they fall into the slumber of hibernation and their body temperature matches that of their environment.
These studies have uncovered large differences in BMR between homeotherms of similar size.
The association is absent, or negative among homeotherms, however, possibly because of their comparatively large offspring (Peters 1983, Roff 1992).
Similarly, terrestrial homeotherms at temperate latitudes also demonstrate an inverse relationship between body size and rates of population turnover (Fenchel 1974, Peters 1983).
The basal metabolic rate of homeotherms is known to depend mainly on body mass, but in mammals, more than 20% of total variance of mass-specific rate not explained by body mass can remain (e.
However, the body-mass-corrected nucleotypic effect can be observed even in homeotherms, at least in mammals.
The nucleotypic effect is demonstrated in homeotherms.
He argued that the large carnivorous reptilian ancestors of mammals were inertial homeotherms.
He hypothesized that because homeotherms are more developmentally stable, and generally experience their habitat in a more fine-grained manner than poikilotherms (Levins, 1968), they might differ in genomic properties such as allelic composition, dosage compensation, or epistatic interactions and thereby in the way heterozygosity and/or changes in environmental conditions interact to influence developmental stability and/or morphology (Selander and Kaufman, 1973; Handford, 1980).
Hence, to increase statistical power and to provide another test of the heterozygosity-morphological variability relationship in homeotherms, herein we use a new and greatly enlarged data set to examine the relationship between heterozygosity and morphological variance among individual Z.