hogweed


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to hogweed: cow parsnip, Common Hogweed

hogweed

(hôg′wēd′, hŏg′-)
n.
1. Any of various coarse weedy plants of the genus Heracleum of the parsley family, having divided leaves and small flowers in umbels, and including several species that are phototoxic.
2. Any of various other coarse weeds, such as horseweed or ragweed.

broom

(brūm)
Herbal made from Cytisus scoparius; purported value as cathartic, diuretic, and emetic. Known to cause abortion. Poisoning possible with overdose. Not approved for any therapeutic purpose.
Synonym(s): broomtop, hogweed, Irish tops, Scotch broom.

hogweed

References in periodicals archive ?
Giant hogweed is a highly invasive plant which is dangerous to humans,, but there are ways to stay safe from it if you know what to look out for.
There is no legal obligation to remove or treat hogweed as long as you are not encouraging or allowing the growth onto adjacent land.
Blisters caused by Giant Hogweed tend to heal very slowly as they can damage DNA, and severe blistering may re-occur for many years.
Hogweed looks like the innocuous cow parsley, with white flowers clustered in an umbrellashaped head that is up to 80cm in diameter.
Originally from Russia, Hogweed was introduced by the Victorians as an ornamental plant.
Giant hogweed can grow 20ft tall and contains a toxic sap, and has spread rapidly, especially on riverbanks, over the past few years.
A close relative of Cow Parsley, Giant Hogweed (pictured) originates from Southern Russia and Georgia.
lv) in one flight over the area in Latvia containing known sample fields containing hogweed and other characteristic types of vegetation (forests, meadows, cornfields etc.
Mark supplements the feast with jars of pickled marsh samphire and magnolia leaves, elderberry vinegar, hogweed seed parkin cake, "quick, quick" sloe gin and elderflower champagne.
People should not attempt to remove giant hogweed with their bare handsaworkers require gloves, goggles, and other protective equipment to safely eliminate the plant with herbicides, the Washington Post reports.
The Dee, Clwyd and Conwy river catchments are under threat from Japanese Knotweed, Himalayan Balsam and Giant Hogweed - rapidly-spreading plants that smother native wildlife.