histone


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Related to histone: nonhistone

histone

 [his´tōn]
a simple protein, soluble in water and insoluble in dilute ammonia, found combined as salts with acidic substances, such as nucleic acids or the globin of hemoglobin.

his·tone (H),

(his'tōn),
One of a number of simple proteins (often found in the cell nucleus); contains a high proportion of basic amino acids; soluble in water, dilute acids, and alkalies; and not coagulable by heat; for example, the proteins associated with nucleic acids in the nuclei of plant and animal tissues. They constitute about half the mass of the chromosomes of eukaryotic cells.

histone

/his·tone/ (his´tōn) a simple protein, soluble in water and insoluble in dilute ammonia, found combined as salts with acidic substances, e.g., the protein combined with nucleic acid or the globin of hemoglobin.

histone

(hĭs′tōn′)
n.
Any of several basic proteins found in association with the DNA in the chromatin of eukaryotes.

histone

[his′tōn]
Etymology: Gk, histos, tissue
any of a group of strongly basic, low-molecular weight proteins that are soluble in water and insoluble in dilute ammonia and combine with DNA to form nucleoproteins. They are found in the nucleus of eukaryotic cells, where they form a complex with DNA in the chromatin and function in regulating gene activity. See also nucleosome.

his·tone

(his'tōn)
One of a number of simple proteins (often found in the cell nucleus) containing a high proportion of basic amino acids, are soluble in water, dilute acids, and alkalies, and are not coagulable by heat.

histone

a type of simple protein that is usually basic and tends to form complexes with nucleic acids (e.g. DNA) forming NUCLEOSOMES. CHROMOSOMES of EUKARYOTES contain large quantities of histones which may regulate DNA functioning in some way. The five major histones are represented as: H1, H2A, H2B, H3 and H4.

histone

a simple protein, soluble in water and insoluble in dilute ammonia, found combined as salts with acidic substances, such as in DNA where they have a structural and functional role.

histone acetylase, histone deacylase
enzymes responsible for the reversible acylation of four lysine residues near the N-terminus of histone H4.
References in periodicals archive ?
Alterations in chromatin structure are brought about by a number of different mechanisms, including covalent histone modifications, incorporation of distinct histone variants and ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling.
Several pharmacological and nonpharmacological epigenetic regulators have also been shown to exert antidepressant effects via inhibition of histone deacetylases.
In conclusion, it is suggested that TSA treatment in SCNT embryos can improve in vitro developmental competence, which may be attributed to histone acetylation levels.
FACMG, a researcher involved in the work from the Departments of Dermatology and Genetics and Development at the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York, NY, and colleagues defined the histone demethylase function of the human hairless gene, both in vitro and using cultured human cells.
So it makes sense that histone methylation is largely used to silence master genes that may be needed at multiple points during development, while DNA methylation is mostly used to switch off genes at later stages, when cells have already been tailored to specific functions, and those genes are less likely to be needed again.
Evidence for the ethanol-induced epigenetic modifications of histone H3 first was obtained by Park and colleagues (2003) who demonstrated H3 acetylation in primary cultures of rat liver cells (i.
A group of researchers at the University of Victoria has demonstrated that calixarene molecules can be used to read information encoded on DNA-packaging proteins called histones.
Immunohistochemical studies performed with anti-PHH3 antibody have shown that the antibody detects specifically the core protein histone H3 only when phosphorylated at serine 10 or serine 28.
Transcription factors and polymerases gain access to specific DNA sequences only if they are released from their close association with the histone core (3, 4).
Among the epigenome which is defined by DNA methylation patterns and the associated posttranslational modifications of histories and non histone proteins is the key regulatory circuit (2).
Snapping acetyl groups onto the tails of some of the histone proteins, for example, helps loosen the connection between DNA and histones, making genes more accessible to transcription factors.