high-risk group

high-risk group

Epidemiology A group of people in the community with a higher-than-expected risk for developing a particular disease, which may be defined on a measurable parameter–eg, an inherited genetic defect, physical attribute, lifestyle, habit, socioeconomic and/or educational feature, as well as environment
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She continued, 'As men living alone seem to be at a higher risk for the development of type 2 diabetes, they should become recognised as a high-risk group in health care.
There is a possibility you may be considered part of a high-risk group and not be eligible to donate; however, this will be determined before you even begin the process.
Interestingly, the high-risk group showed significantly greater risk for first depression between ages 20 and 40 compared to the low-risk group, but between ages 40 and 60, the two risk groups were not significantly different.
Examining autopsy and toxicology reports of people killed while being arrested, Williams compares differences in the physiological attributes of arrest-related sudden deaths in order to estimate whether a difference exists in high-risk group attributes between deaths proximate to the use of a TASER electronic control device and deaths not involving the use of an electronic control device.
Children who are born prematurely have more than four times the risk of severe flu complications, despite not being considered a high-risk group by U.
In contrast, there is a higher rate of emigration in the high-risk group reducing the pool of available workforce in those cities.
It is important that you get immunised every year if you are in a high-risk group or over 65 as the type of flu going round changes from year to year.
Public Health also encourages those who don't fall into a high-risk group to consider getting the seasonal flu shot.
Pregnant women were identified early on as a high-risk group, but concerns were heightened after a woman with swine flu died last week, after giving birth prematurely.
Overall, the presence of colonic neoplasia was 23% in the average-risk group and 33% in the high-risk group.
The 76 women in the high-risk group had ASA scores of P3 and P4, whereas the 629 in the low-risk group had ASA scores of P1 and P2.
The 15-year survival rate for the high-risk group in the study represented an improvement over a previous study with a 10-year follow-up.