hexapod


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hexapod

(hĕk′sə-pŏd′)
n.
Any of numerous six-legged arthropods of the subphylum Hexapoda, which includes the insects and several groups formerly classified as insects, such as the springtails.
adj.
1. Of or belonging to the subphylum Hexapoda.
2. Having six legs or feet.

hex·ap′o·dous (hĕk-săp′ə-dəs) adj.

hexapod

see INSECT.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Type HX-M350 hexapod with electromagnetic actuators Courtesy of Moog CSA Engineering
The mode of operation of the hexapod for this particular application is seen as in the block diagram.
Nitulescu) y denominada Stability Analysis Software Plataform Dedicated for a Hexapod Robot, se analizo la locomocion de las patas sobre terreno plano; se observo que el sistema presenta una serie de problemas en cuanto al control debido a la complejidad de lograr la estabilidad y coordinacion de las patas en diferentes situaciones; es por esto que realizo la simulacion para lograr la comprension del control de las patas.
Armada, Minimizing Energy Consumption in Hexapod Robots, Advanced Robotics, vol.
Reference [6] shows that in order to minimize hexapod robots energy consumption when walking on even terrain, an energy consumption model must be established.
2013 Hexapod walking robot energy consumption dependence on the number of legs set on the surface, Electrical and Control Technologies ECT-2013, 2-3 May, 2013, Kaunas, Lithuania, 25-28.
The simple to use HXP1000 Hexapod is ideal for motion positioning tasks that require up to six degrees of motion and flexible coordinate systems or pivot points.
With no moving cables or accumulation of errors, the hexapod serves motion applications requiring complex combinations of rotation and linear motion, high load capacity, and repeatability in up to 6 independent axes: X, Y, Z, pitch, roll, and yaw.
has developed a solution with two new, six-axis motion controllers for its H-Series hexapod positioners.
Even though the wings significantly improved the running performance of the 10-centimeter-long robot -- called DASH, short for Dynamic Autonomous Sprawled Hexapod - engineers at the University of California, Berkeley, found that the extra boost would not have generated enough speed to launch the critter from the ground.
The Wira Hexapod Tumbler has been redesigned to optimize laboratory bench space.