heteronomy


Also found in: Dictionary, Legal, Wikipedia.

het·er·on·o·my

(het'ĕr-on'ō-mē),
The condition or state of being heteronomous.
[hetero- + G. nomos, law]

het·er·on·o·my

(het'ĕr-on'ŏ-mē)
The condition or state of being heteronomous.
[hetero- + G. nomos, law]
References in periodicals archive ?
Multiple voices narrate the central story, the story of a relation made possible through this "vague orientation" of crip seduction--relations conditioned by dis/abled bodies--emphasizing the heteronomy of such situations as the ill condition (male habitus) that connect rather than separate people.
77) Modelling a torturous "dialectic of subject and object," De Quincey needs to guard the mind against passivity and heteronomy on one side, and overweening solipsism on the other.
He offers insightful comments on the false self, radical heteronomy and autonomy, and frequent reprises of the interrelationship of freedom and love.
Artists can imagine conditions outside the confines of reality, in a way that mirrors the uncertainty of contemporary art's current situation: one ineluctably double-bound between art and non-art, autonomy and heteronomy, spleen and activism, an aesthetics of resistance and an aesthetics of insurrection.
The Kurds in Turkey suffer from century's long heteronomy and the Turks lack the "social glue" to be able to acknowledge any rights to the Kurds.
In some fields, such as sociology, "entry conditions, measured in academic terms, are very low," in comparison with natural science (Bourdieu 2004:47), contributing to a relatively weak autonomy, and extensive heteronomy within.
Deci and Ryan (1985) argue that the process of internalization reflects an individual's intrinsic tendencies to assimilate and integrate external objects into more self-determined ones and to move away from heteronomy toward autonomy.
Finally, the controversy has changing degrees of heteronomy to each arena, according to the developments of the debate.
It is important also to recognize the existence of an "off-space" (De Lauretis, 1987: 18) or "off-spaces" which subsist in the margins of hegemonic discourse, allowing for a multiplicity and heteronomy of lived experience.
Assertive speech acts create assertive rules (practices, habits) and hegemonic societies (assertive rule), directive speech acts produce directive rules and political authoritarianism (directive rule); finally, commissive speech acts create heteronomy, or the 'unintended consequences' mentioned above: agents which act rational but produce nevertheless irrational consequences.
Personal autonomy, not heteronomy, wins out in human rights" (125).
For example, my "formal" conception, because of its emphasis on an individual's right to rely on her own conceptions of the good and the right in respect to her use of her body or voice, might be viewed as the opposite of autonomy in a Kantian sense because such uses reflect heteronomy rather than self-legislation free of phenomenal influences or conceptions of the good.