heterology


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het·er·ol·o·gy

(het'ĕr-ol'ŏ-jē),
A departure from the normal in structure, arrangement, or mode or time of development.

heterology

A term of waning use for an aberration in structure, organisation or timing of embryonic development; e.g., dysgenesis.
References in periodicals archive ?
The debate could be to clarify the elements that condition that agonism or that heterology.
Using Bataille's theories of heterology with such a well-read text as The Awakening is not to make Chopin work for Bataille either; rather it is to allow him to help us see the larger ontological dimensions of Edna's Icarian journey and to explore Chopin's own vision of heterology.
33) Fred Botting, in an issue of the Oxford Literary Review with the title "Experiencing the Impossible, evokes the importance of Bataille's heterology and quotes Denis Hollier's Against Architecture.
Heterology and the Postmodern: Bataille, Baudrillard, and Lyotard.
It is only reasonable, then, that alterity will have had to pay a high price for its domestication and integration: that of its own alteration from a supplement into a complementum: "Can an aesthetically charged heterology .
The collection's strength is the exposure and level of detailed information it gives us in the first place to a specific group of Anglo-Canadian writers quite remarkable in their varied fictive practices and uses of cultural heterology, for example women's writing, native Americans and deracination, big-city immigrant experience, oral and written traditions, and reworkings of traditional genres such as autobiography, detective fiction, and the news story.
She posits that in the last century comparative literature was restricted by the nation approach within while in the twenty-first century it will undoubtedly step onto the stage of East-West cultural communication characterized by heterogeneity and heterology (see Yue, Chen, Wang, Zhang 19).
Luce Giard, "Epilogue: Michel de Certeau's Heterology and the New World,'1 in Representations 33 (1991), 216.
A submission to this duality of its aesthetic and post-aesthetic experiences wraps us in a "good" that is far from the madding crowd's ignoble strife for only heterology, ecriture, and differance.
Emancipation is a moment concomitant with that of subjectivation, 'the polemical verification of equality' (Ranciere, 2004b: 86), and entails a logic of heterology insofar as, for those who have no part to demand a part amounts to a re-distribution of parts in the name of something improper to the logic of parts.
I specifically explore how the unsettling of the Hellenic exclusivity and localization of the beautiful can leave room for a more liberal mediation of the real and the ideal; that is to say, how far it can allow for the reality of heterology and syncretism to inform and reform the ideal (Hellenic) Self, which may consequently effect a more contingent (and not necessarily territorial) experience of the "nation" and "homeland.
15) He marks a Bataillean heterology, rather than Marxist science, as the outside of ideological subjection.